New female marine pilot in Cape Town

by Marine-Pilots.com - published -
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New female marine pilot in Cape Town
Text and picture by Transnet

Smooth Sailing To Open Pilot's Licence

Congrats to the Port of Cape Town's Ellen Moletsane on earning her Open Licence as a marine pilot.
Born and raked far from the ocean in Pretoria, Ellen had limited exposure to the maritime industry in her youth.
But a Transnet bursary advert calling for black female applicants piqued her interest and changed her course.

She studied at the then Cape Technikon and completed sea time training with Safmarine. She then trained and worked as a tug master for five years, before taking on the piloting programme which involved 12 months of classroom theory and on-the-job training. Ellen obtained her 15000 GRT license and then went on to acquire her Open Licence.

As a female in the industry, she has had her fair share of trials. "It is very challenging to be the only woman on a ship full of men every day, but you find yourself and the person you can be through difficult experiences:' she said. "I run my own race. I don't have to be fast: I just have to keep going:'

Her advice to youngsters is: "find your passion, set goals and commit to them'.
Original post by Transnet on LinkedIn
Original post by Transnet on LinkedIn
Original post by Transnet on LinkedIn
Original post by Transnet on LinkedIn
Transnet National Ports Authority
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Video How Ship Anchor Works? - Procedure For Anchoring a Ship at Sea

Found on YouTube. Created by "marineinsight".

#Anchor #shipanchor #windlass
Anchoring is one of the very frequent operations onboard ships. A number of variables and external factors influence the duration and location of an anchoring operation. While the type of seabed is of utmost importance during anchoring, soft muddy grounds or clay bottoms are best preferred. It should be taken care that the anchoring bottom is free of power lines, submarine cables, pipelines or rocks.

Various methods on anchoring include consideration of direction and strength of wind, current and tidal stream. Often good local knowledge helps a mariner determine required manoeuvres and actions to be taken while anchoring.

This operations comes under the responsibility of deck officers. It involves the use of critical shipboard equipment and requires high level of situational awareness. The key responsibility of the deck officer at an anchor station is to use the anchoring machinery and available man power for carrying out the operation safely and efficiently in accordance with the master’s instructions.

In most of the cases, theoretical guidelines and bookish knowledge are helpful only to an extent. Situational awareness and spontaneity of the officers, and their instant decision making capability helps to carry out the operation fruitfully. A good knowledge of ship’s maneuverability and the limitation of the equipment involved will further help the officer to make such spontaneous decisions. The competency of the officer is decided upon his ability to consider the situation, command his crew and to assess the orders give by the Master, to carry out the operation safely and efficiently.

Read: 9 Points to Remember When Dropping Ship Anchor in Emergency - https://www.marineinsight.com/guidelines/9-points-remember-dropping-ship-anchor-emergency/

Video Credit: https://www.youtube.com/user/neo5362/
Movie Clip Credit: Caddyshack
Image Credit: http://bit.ly/2VmUB6R

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The video was found on some social media channels in June 2020.

When so many elementary mistakes are made and so many risks are taken, this is exactly what can happen!

It's a demonstrative example of an unprofessional action:
1) Where is the life jacket?
2) No backpack on the shoulders. Use a rope to have the backpack lifted by the deck crew.
3) Where is the rest of the crew (on vessel / on the small boat) for safe assistance?

What other mistakes have you discovered?

We do not put videos of accidents on our website out of voyeurism. We would like to point out that the work of a pilot or a seafarer is always dangerous, especially when embarking and disembarking!
These incidents should be a warning. It can hit anyone out of carelessness.
Dear people, please always be mindful and always think of your safety!
We hope no one was seriously injured.

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