Unofficial internal company timeline report of the ship accident in Busan 6 April 2020

by Marine-Pilots.com - published -
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Unofficial internal company timeline report of the ship accident in Busan 6 April 2020
Source: "ONE - MSQ Accident News No. 31"

Summary
ONE operated 13,900 TEU vessel “M/V Milano Bridge” (built 2018) collided with gantry cranes and another vessel while approaching berth at PNC #8. This was the first berthing for phasing-in after dry dock. It is understood the vessel was scheduled to be fitted with a scrubber.

Timeline (LT)
Two tugs in action throughput below the timeline, FWD and AFT, could not provide adequate pull due to the high FWD speed, use of bow thruster not fully known.

14:37
Commenced STBD turn, STBD 20 Helm, Dead Slow ahead, Speed 9,3 kts.

14:39
Stopped engine, Speed 7,6 kts

14:40
Pilot appeared panicked, Speed 7,6 Kts, Dead Slow ahead, STBD 20 helms.

14:42
Pilot realizes heavy drift to port, panicked, full ahead engine, hard STBD helm, concerned to avoid three moored vessels. AFT tug continuously pulling.

14:44
Cleared first moored vessel, drifting towards the second moored vessel, Navigation full ahead, STBD 20 helm, drifting further towards the berth. FWD tug's action not known as pilot speaking in the local language. Master used BT.

14:47
Cleared second moored vessel, random orders on ME and rudder, stern drifting towards port side, Speed 6 Kts.

14:47
Cleared lesser beamed the third vessel.

14:49
Made hard contact with Gantry Crane No. 85, fully collapsed on stern of the vessel. ME Navigation full ahead, Speed 5,2 Kts. FWD tug not pulling.

14:50
Emergency full stern to prevent contact with moored vessel ahead.

14:52
Hard contact with Gantry Crane No. 81 by bridge wing, which was working on the moored container vessel ahead followed by slight contact with moored vessel around Bay 02 & 06.

timeline end...


Fragment of the internal report

Watch also (video of the accident)
Watch also (video of AIS track)

Additional information by TradeWinds:
According to a report of TradeWinds (www.TradeWindsNews.com) the "Milano Bridge" is owned by Japan’s K Line. However it is on charter to One Ocean Network (ONE), the all-Japanese boxship joint venture company.

“ONE is urgently looking into the circumstances of this (accident) and is giving full co-operation to the terminal operators and the local authorities in Busan,” it said.

The commercial management of the ship is with K Line. But its International Safety Management (ISM) manager is listed by port state control data base Equasis as Singapore based Fleet Management.

The vessel is listed as owned by MI DAS Shipping, a company linked to Japanese shipowner Doun Shipping.

The ship’s protection and indemnity cover is with the Japan P&I Club which is likely to face a costly claim as a result of the accident.

Similar crane and ship collisions in the past have run up claims running up to tens of millions of US dollars for P&I insurers, which are liable for the loss of the crane and the ship but also disruption caused to the port as a result of the accident.

EDITOR'S REMARK:
We only report on the incident objectively and we do not allow ourselves to make a quick judgement about what happened.
This is a terrible accident, especially for the involved crews on ships and cranes, the captain and the pilot. Please have respect for the people! We will have to wait for the investigation and will continue to report on it.

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Video Operating an STS Gantry Crane (Joystick Cam): Loading a vessel in the Port of Antwerp

Found on YouTube. Created by "Container World".

This cabinview video shows how to control a STS crane, there will follow a video were I show you all the buttons and joystick controls. Lot of people request these video's. This shows how to operate en ship to shore crane with a joystick camera! (DUAL CAM)

Make sure you LIKE and SHARE this video is you want more video's like this!

Hope you enjoy!

Feel free to comment & subscribe!

SUB LINK:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqoYj7ua7HwHvjjjyv3VyXA?sub_confirmation=1

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Video Busan Port: Collision of MILANO BRIDGE with cranes and container ship SEASPAN GANGES

Found on YouTube. Created by SailorsTV on Apr 6.

Container ship MILANO BRIDGE in the afternoon Apr 6 contacted gantry crane 85 at Busan New Port container terminal while proceeding to berth 7 with pilot on board, then she contacted berthed container ship SEASPAN GANGES, and moving on momentum further on, contacted cranes 81 and 84. Crane 85 collapsed, cranes 81 and 84 were derailed, crane 85 operator was slightly injured.

SEASPAN GANGES left port shortly after accident, understood damages were slight or none.

MILANO BRIDGE as of 1100 UTC wasn’t yet moored, probably because of crane debris on her stern.

Watch also (video of AIS track)
Unofficial internal company timeline report

REMARK:
Thanks for serious comments. We only show the incident objectively and we do not allow ourselves to make a quick judgement about what happened.
This is a terrible accident, especially for the involved crews on ships and cranes, the captain and the pilot. Please have respect for the people! We will have to wait for the investigation and will continue to report on it.
Nobody wants to experience such an accident themselves.

0

Video AIS Track APL MEXICO CITY - Accident in Antwerp on 09.12.2019

Found on YouTube. Created by "Marine-Pilots". Recorded on 2019-12-09.

Video AIS Track by Nolan Dragon - www.MarineTraffic.com

What had happened:
Container ship APL MEXICO CITY broke off her mooring at Doel, Antwerp, in the afternoon Dec 9, drifted across harbor and contacted DP World pier crane. Crane collapsed and was totally destroyed. No injures reported.

Cause of the accident (according to the report from FEBIMA):
"The allision of the mv APL MEXICO CITY with a gantry crane at the Port of Antwerp on 9 December 2019 stemmed from exceptional meteorological conditions and the not availability of tugboats to assist the vessel in remaining alongside as requested by the Master, that have lead to the breaking of seven mooring hawsers on the foreship of the vessel.

Subsequently, in order to gain control over the vessel and prevent damages the main engine of the ship was put ahead. All mooring hawsers at the stern of the vessel broke. The vessel subsequently sailed/drifted onto the gantry crane at the opposite side of the Deurganckdok thereby destroying it. The falling jib of the crane damaged the ship’s hull and propeller, rendering the vessel no longer seaworthy. In the further drifting/sailing onto the river Scheldt, a buoy and dolphin were damaged/destroyed."

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