A day in the life of a pilot boat

published -
23

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Experiences

Found on YouTube. Created by "Bruce Flett"

PILOT LAUNCH SCAPA PATHFINDER IN ACTION...4/5/2020

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Article TWO NEW METAL SHARK PILOT BOATS NOW SERVING PORT OF NEW ORLEANS

by Metal Shark Boats - published -
352

Jeanerette, LA – November 14th, 2019: Shipbuilder Metal Shark has delivered two new pilot boats to New Orleans-based operator Belle Chasse Marine Transportation, LLC (BCMT).

Article Sixth High-Speed Launch for Delta Pilots

by Gladding Hearn Shipbuilding - published -
595

Delta Launch Services has ordered a new pilot boat from Gladding Hearn Shipbuilding (Duclos Corporation).

This is the sixth St. John’s Class launch built by the Somerset, Mass. shipyard. Delivery of the new 52-footer is scheduled for July 2020.

Article NEW PILOT BOAT DPC TOLKA ARRIVES IN DUBLIN PORT

by Marine-Pilots.com - published -
489

Dublin Port Company has taken delivery of a new Pilot Boat, named DPC Tolka. The state-of-the art vessel arrived in Dublin Port having set sail from Great Yarmouth via Lowestoft, Dover, Gosport, Plymouth, Falmouth and Milford Haven.

Video Those Who Serve: Columbia River bar pilots risk their lives to guide cargo ships

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Found on YouTube. Created by KGW News. (08/02/2019)

Columbia River Bar Pilots risk their lives every day and night to keep cargo ships moving across the dangerous Columbia River Bar. They work in any weather and help protect the environment by making sure the big ships do not crash on their way in or out of the river.

Story: on.kgw.com/2OHTBMH
Subscribe: https://on.kgw.com/2qjvmFg
Find KGW News online: https://www.kgw.com/

Video Marine Pilot at work in the port of Hamburg

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How do marine pilots work?

Example: Bringing a bulkcarrier alongside to „Hansaport“ in Hamburg.
Here the tugboats „Prompt“, „Resolute“ and „Bulldog“ are involved.
The master has to rely on the pilot. One reason is, that he can‘t know how to deal with these tugs.

A maneuver like this is only safe, when the pilot has a lot of practical experience. A master who is doing a maneuver like this only about once or twice a month and each time with tugs he doesn’t know in areas he hasn’t been to often before will be happy to have a pilot to rely on.

A pilot is happy with a master having confidence in him.
Anyway the master keeps his overriding authority at any time.
Does the master have to ask every 30 seconds „What are the tugs doing“? Should he be able to see it himself? Does the pilot have to explain every 30 seconds what the tugs are going to do or what he will do next?

Well, the pilot and the master should talk about the maneuver and expected challenges before it becomes difficult. During a time of high concentration the maneuver should not be interrupted by unnecessary explanation. Anyway, when the master feels unsafe, he will raise his voice at any time he wants to.
In this case the Master and pilot felt comfortable!

In times of corona we have to keep a social distance even to the master, so he couldn't stand directly next to me.

Video Berthing Bulk carrier Ince Ilgaz - Drone video

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Found on YouTube. Created by Airdrone RO.

Video St Johns Bar Pilot Association

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A collection of action from the St Johns Bar Pilot Association

In the early 1800′s as the commercial ports along the St Johns River began to develop, a select group of brave and skilled seafarers would row to sea to meet arriving cargo sailing ships. These daring individuals would use their extensive local knowledge to safely guide the sailing ships across the treacherous sand bars that guarded the river entrance. This was the origin of the St. Johns Bar Pilots. Initially it was a bit of a free-for-all as competition was keen among these pilots to be first to “call for the ship” and claim the right to pilot the ships in and out of port.

In 1890, an enterprising pilot, Captain George Spaulding, purchased a former America’s Cup contender, the schooner “META”. Understandably very fast, Captain Spaulding and the META were soon winning the majority of “Calls” for the St. Johns River. At the urging of the other pilots, Captain Spaulding sold shares in the META and created the St. Johns Bar Pilot Association in the fall of 1890. The META became the first official St. Johns Pilot Boat.

The daily assigned pilot would board META at dawn and take station outside the mouth of the river. After a day of working on the river, the pilots would return to the river mouth just before sunset. In 1931, a Richfield Oil Tanker was the first vessel to navigate the river at night, thereby ushering in a new era of commercial service for arrivals and departures.

The first real pilot station was a pair of wooden buildings built on a low spit of land that formed Ribault Bay. That land is now under the carrier piers at Naval Station Mayport, and Ribault Bay is now known as the Naval basin. The station was moved to its current location with the construction of the Navy base in the 1940s.

For more than 120 years, the traditions of safety and excellence in service have been passed from one Pilot to the next. All of the modern St. Johns Bar Pilots hold unlimited endorsements as First Class Pilot and have extensive leadership experience from their prior service at sea. Pilots are available at anytime, day or night, and often board and pilot vessels in the most frightening conditions of wind, seas, rain and fog. They are among the most intensely trained and experienced mariners in the world. The Pilot’s dedication to serve the marine transportation interests of the port of Jacksonville are in keeping with their mantra:

“providing pilotage for vessels utilizing the navigable waters of the St. Johns River in order that resources, the environment, life and property may be protected to the fullest extent possible”

Video American P&I Club Video: "Safe Boarding – Three Keys" by Danielle Centeno

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Found on YouTube. Created by "American P&I Club"

The American P&I Club’s Loss Prevention team is dedicated to protecting the most valuable resource the maritime industry has – the human resource! Earlier this year, the Club hosted local Members, pilots, and industry experts in New York City for a round table discussion entitled “Safe Boarding of Vessels”. Participants discussed boarding procedures and boarding equipment on various types of vessels and solutions for reducing the risk of slips, trips and falls.

In this video, Danielle Centeno – Vice President, Loss Prevention/Survey Compliance – discusses three keys to safe boarding that came out of that session.

For more on safe boarding – and many more safety-related topics – please see the Loss Prevention section of the Club’s website:

Video AIS track of MILANO BRIDGE on 6 April 2020 (Busan port)

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According to AIS past track data, the vessel was obviously too fast on 9 knots and also going down the wind (4-5 bft., take a look at the exhaust from the stack) when entered the inner harbour considering the size and displacement. That speed was approximate 3 ship lengths to the pier and there was the on pier wind after the turn.

Why the ship entered the port so fast will be the subject of the investigations to be awaited.

Knowing South Korea procedures there will be no just marine accident but also a criminal investigation into the accident.
Luckily no human serious casualties occurred.

Watch also (video of the accident)
Unofficial internal company timeline report