How a pilot gets off a fairly large ship

published

Region: -
Categories:
Pilot boarding

Departing a 159,000 tonne 274 metre long tanker at the Humber Pilot station

Join the conversation...

There are two comments to this.
Login or register to view comments and join the discussion!
Read more...

Video Pilot Boat - Carnival Cruise at Port Canaveral

This is a video of the cruise ship pilot boat that picks up the pilot once he has navigated the ship out of the port. This is a requirement of all cruise ships coming into and leaving out of ports. We also noticed them at the Bahamas. I was able to capture this one on my last cruise leaving out of Port Canaveral... watch as the pilot jumps from the cruise ship to the pilot boat while both are moving! :)

Video Disembarking of Danpilot at Skagen V73

Enjoy the tour from Bridge to Pilot ladder, disembarking of Danpilot.

Video Harbor Pilot Disembarking at Bar Pilot Station Liverpool UK

After almost four hours of work to safely guide and assist the Ship's Captain in navigating the vessel out from Liverpool's Royal Seaforth Container/Roro Terminal (RSCT) in Liverpool UK, the Harbor Pilot disembarks at Bar Pilot Station, a rendezvous point or certain place where a ship should take the Sea/River/Harbor Pilot on and off. In this video, the Pilot disembarked at the Starboard side (right side), lee side of the vessel which is the normal practice. The term "lee side" means away or that is sheltered from the wind. The vessel should slow down and maneuver safely to place the vessel to the lee side. Pilots usually advised the Captain of the approximate speed and heading required for this critical phase of ship handling and operation. The ship Captain, being the top in command, is on the bridge navigation deck to oversee, handle and assess safe operation. Good communication is a vital key to this operation. He/She should communicate with the Deck Officer in order for the Deck Ratings to prepare all the equipment and of course the "Pilot ladder" for safe disembarkation. The Captain should communicate with the Pilot boat as well. He/she should also confirm with the Deck Officer that the ladder has been properly checked and rigged as per instruction/recommendation from the Pilot. He/She should also communicate with the Engine room that the Pilot is about to disembark, and upon leaving the vessel, the Deck Officer should report to the Captain that the Pilot has safely disembarked, take note of the time as this is usually included in some of the ship reporting which is to be done later on, the Captain notifies the Engine room of the actual time of Pilot disembarkation. After a safe Pilot disembarkation, the Deck Ratings should secure the Pilot ladder for sea passage, other equipment used and also the Pilot door opening, if there is any. All of this operation should be done with the utmost care, as SAFETY is the top priority onboard.

Video Helicoptertransfer from Pilot Station Vessel PROCYON

Found on YouTube. Created by The Rotterdam Pilot

During high wind conditions it is sometimes required to transfer pilots from the Pilot Station Vessels to incoming ships. In this case the NHV Dauphin Helicopter came to collect a pilot an d luggage form the PROCYON at Maascenter pilot station.

Video St Johns Bar Pilot Association

A collection of action from the St Johns Bar Pilot Association

In the early 1800′s as the commercial ports along the St Johns River began to develop, a select group of brave and skilled seafarers would row to sea to meet arriving cargo sailing ships. These daring individuals would use their extensive local knowledge to safely guide the sailing ships across the treacherous sand bars that guarded the river entrance. This was the origin of the St. Johns Bar Pilots. Initially it was a bit of a free-for-all as competition was keen among these pilots to be first to “call for the ship” and claim the right to pilot the ships in and out of port.

In 1890, an enterprising pilot, Captain George Spaulding, purchased a former America’s Cup contender, the schooner “META”. Understandably very fast, Captain Spaulding and the META were soon winning the majority of “Calls” for the St. Johns River. At the urging of the other pilots, Captain Spaulding sold shares in the META and created the St. Johns Bar Pilot Association in the fall of 1890. The META became the first official St. Johns Pilot Boat.

The daily assigned pilot would board META at dawn and take station outside the mouth of the river. After a day of working on the river, the pilots would return to the river mouth just before sunset. In 1931, a Richfield Oil Tanker was the first vessel to navigate the river at night, thereby ushering in a new era of commercial service for arrivals and departures.

The first real pilot station was a pair of wooden buildings built on a low spit of land that formed Ribault Bay. That land is now under the carrier piers at Naval Station Mayport, and Ribault Bay is now known as the Naval basin. The station was moved to its current location with the construction of the Navy base in the 1940s.

For more than 120 years, the traditions of safety and excellence in service have been passed from one Pilot to the next. All of the modern St. Johns Bar Pilots hold unlimited endorsements as First Class Pilot and have extensive leadership experience from their prior service at sea. Pilots are available at anytime, day or night, and often board and pilot vessels in the most frightening conditions of wind, seas, rain and fog. They are among the most intensely trained and experienced mariners in the world. The Pilot’s dedication to serve the marine transportation interests of the port of Jacksonville are in keeping with their mantra:

“providing pilotage for vessels utilizing the navigable waters of the St. Johns River in order that resources, the environment, life and property may be protected to the fullest extent possible”

Article Origins of the IMPA pilot mark

by Kevin Vallance deep sea pilot and author - published

There are many things in both our everyday and professional lives which we take for granted and never question the origins of, an example of this might be the IMPA recommended ‘pilot mark or pilot line’, which is sometimes seen on the side of vessels indicating where a vessels freeboard exceeds 9 metres.

Video Pilots gets off Huron Belle Pilot boat and climbs aboard CSL Assiniboine - 08.04.19

Found on YouTube. Created by Andrea Guerriero:

"This is a Lakes Pilot hopping off the Huron Belle Pilot boat after we've pulled alongside the CSL Assiniboine on the Detroit River just above the Ambassador Bridge in Detroit, MI

He walks along the side of the Pilot boat, holding onto the railing and then after the gangway from the ship is lowered into position, he steps up and pulls himself up to then begin walking up the gangway to the deck where he is greeted by the crew.

We then see one of the crew from the Pilot boat tieing up the Pilot's bag to send it aboard and I pan around to show you the area and how close we are to the ship before ending the video."

Video Unboxing the TRENZ Pilot Plug

In this video we show you the contents of the TRENZ Pilot Plug package.

Please visit https://trenz-pilotplug.com/ for more information.

Video Marine Pilot at work in the port of Hamburg

How do marine pilots work?

Example: Bringing a bulkcarrier alongside to „Hansaport“ in Hamburg.
Here the tugboats „Prompt“, „Resolute“ and „Bulldog“ are involved.
The master has to rely on the pilot. One reason is, that he can‘t know how to deal with these tugs.

A maneuver like this is only safe, when the pilot has a lot of practical experience. A master who is doing a maneuver like this only about once or twice a month and each time with tugs he doesn’t know in areas he hasn’t been to often before will be happy to have a pilot to rely on.

A pilot is happy with a master having confidence in him.
Anyway the master keeps his overriding authority at any time.
Does the master have to ask every 30 seconds „What are the tugs doing“? Should he be able to see it himself? Does the pilot have to explain every 30 seconds what the tugs are going to do or what he will do next?

Well, the pilot and the master should talk about the maneuver and expected challenges before it becomes difficult. During a time of high concentration the maneuver should not be interrupted by unnecessary explanation. Anyway, when the master feels unsafe, he will raise his voice at any time he wants to.
In this case the Master and pilot felt comfortable!

In times of corona we have to keep a social distance even to the master, so he couldn't stand directly next to me.

Article New app: Pilot´s Tug Assist Tool PTAT - Bollard Pull Calculation for Marine Pilots

by Capt. M. Baykal Yaylai - published

Required tug power and number of tugs needed in variable conditions of wind, current and waves isin most cases an assessment made by pilots based on their professional experience. However, assessments will raise questions by lawyers if something goes wrong. They will use tools to calculate what really is needed with respect to tug power and number of tugs. They have furthermore the advantage of time.