Meet Captain Lyle Donovan, a San Diego Bay pilot with the San Diego Bay Pilots Association

published

Region: USA
Categories:
Pilot boarding · Pilotage in general

May is Maritime Month at the Port of San Diego and we are proud to highlight some of our hardworking men and women of the Working Waterfront. Meet Captain Lyle Donovan, a San Diego Bay pilot with the San Diego Bay Pilots Association. His work consists of guiding ships in and out of San Diego Bay in a safe and efficient manner. A typical day includes guiding a 650-foot car carrying vessel or a 950-foot cruise ship into San Diego Bay. This entails boarding the vessels by climbing up a ladder, often in very rough seas and usually when it’s still dark out. The Port of San Diego thanks Captain Donovan and his fellow pilots for their hard work. To read more about the importance of the maritime industry, visit portofsandiego.org/maritimemonth

San Diego Bay Pilots Association

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