"Providence" South Wales Pilot Boat

published (on YouTube: on 5 January 2014) -
533

Region: -
Categories:
Pilotage in general

Found on YouTube. Created by "Ross Purchase".

This video is about the people who work for South East Wales Pilotage, the Pilots and Cutter crew

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Video "Providence" South Wales Pilot Boat

Found on YouTube. Created by "Ross Purchase".
This video is about the people who work for South East Wales Pilotage, the Pilots and Cutter crew

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Video Robust pilot boats of Netherlands and Belgium

Found on YouTube. Created by "SEAL Sea Air Land".

These are some of the reliable sturdy Pilot boats of Netherlands and Belgium to bring and pick up Marine Pilots to and from commercial merchant vessels either inbound or outbound. The Marine Pilots are licensed PROFESSIONALS who have a thorough knowledge of a certain port and they guide the Master/Captain of commercial ships in and out of the foreign Seaport.

Location: Steenbank Pilot Station, Flushing/Vlissingen Pilot Station, Wandelaar Pilot Station.

Boats in order of appearance in this video:
00:05 *Pilot Boat Cetus of Netherlands (NL); Callsign: PHDH ; IMO#: 9367102 ; MMSI#: 246380000 ; Year Built: 2005 ; GRT: 228 ; Length X Beam (meters): 25.65 X 13.0 [Catamaran type/double hull]
Video link: https://youtu.be/pVlWGcOLVL0

01:03 *Pilot Boat Raan of Belgium (BE); Callsign: ORBX ; IMO#: 9680140 ; MMSI#: 205650000 ; Year Built: 2014 ; GRT: 53 ; Length X Beam (meters): 19.69 X 4.0 [conventional/single hull]

01:19 *Pilot Boat Westerschelde of Belgium (BE) ; Callsign: ORPV ; IMO#: 9569009 ; MMSI#: 205593000 ; Year Built: 2011 ; GRT: 227 ; Length X Beam (meters): 25.65 X 14.25 [Catamaran type/double hull]
Video link: https://youtu.be/pVlWGcOLVL0

02:49 *Pilot Boat Wielingen of Belgium (BE) [appeared as picture only] ; Callsign: ORPU ; IMO#: 9568990 ; MMSI#: 205592000 ; Year Built: 2011 ; GRT: 227 ; Length X Beam (meters): 25.65 X 14.25 [Catamaran type/double hull]

02:56 **Special Purpose Vessel / Pilot Vessel Polaris of Netherlands (NL); Callsign: PBZN ; IMO#: 9496915 ; MMSI#: 245142000 ; Year Built: 2012 ; GRT: 2,501 ; Length X Beam (meters): 81.2 X 13.3 [conventional/single hull]
Video link: https://youtu.be/70dcuZdQM1M

03:12 *Pilot Boat Pioneer Pilots of Netherlands (NL) ; Callsign: PCGX ; IMO#: N/A ; MMSI#: 245711000 ; Year Built: N/A ; GRT: N/A ; Length X Beam (meters): 21.0 X 6.0 [conventional/single hull]
Video link: https://youtu.be/XQds_uWnjuI

#PilotBoat #PilotVessel #Netherlands_Belgium

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Thanks to "seAnaVIgATOR18" for contributing this video.
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Video How Ship Anchor Works? - Procedure For Anchoring a Ship at Sea

Found on YouTube. Created by "marineinsight".

#Anchor #shipanchor #windlass
Anchoring is one of the very frequent operations onboard ships. A number of variables and external factors influence the duration and location of an anchoring operation. While the type of seabed is of utmost importance during anchoring, soft muddy grounds or clay bottoms are best preferred. It should be taken care that the anchoring bottom is free of power lines, submarine cables, pipelines or rocks.

Various methods on anchoring include consideration of direction and strength of wind, current and tidal stream. Often good local knowledge helps a mariner determine required manoeuvres and actions to be taken while anchoring.

This operations comes under the responsibility of deck officers. It involves the use of critical shipboard equipment and requires high level of situational awareness. The key responsibility of the deck officer at an anchor station is to use the anchoring machinery and available man power for carrying out the operation safely and efficiently in accordance with the master’s instructions.

In most of the cases, theoretical guidelines and bookish knowledge are helpful only to an extent. Situational awareness and spontaneity of the officers, and their instant decision making capability helps to carry out the operation fruitfully. A good knowledge of ship’s maneuverability and the limitation of the equipment involved will further help the officer to make such spontaneous decisions. The competency of the officer is decided upon his ability to consider the situation, command his crew and to assess the orders give by the Master, to carry out the operation safely and efficiently.

Read: 9 Points to Remember When Dropping Ship Anchor in Emergency - https://www.marineinsight.com/guidelines/9-points-remember-dropping-ship-anchor-emergency/

Video Credit: https://www.youtube.com/user/neo5362/
Movie Clip Credit: Caddyshack
Image Credit: http://bit.ly/2VmUB6R

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Video “Harbor Pilot” 1960s Los Angeles Harbor Freighters & Ships Education Film

Harbor Pilot is a short film from 1967 that gives viewers a brief look at what a harbor pilot is and does. The film opens with footage of a sailboat sailing at sea, followed by a shot of a rocky coastline (01:10) and then an aerial view of a modern harbor — the Port of Los Angeles. A large freight ship, SS Gemstone, is out at sea. A harbor pilot stands on land at the Port of Los Angeles, looking out over the harbor. He walks into the pilot station at the entrance to the harbor to check the schedule. He looks through a telescope for an incoming ship (02:35). The pilot walks out onto the dock and climbs into the pilot boat, which he then steers to the incoming ship (03:49). The harbor pilot climbs out of the boat and up the side of the ship. On the bridge, he meets with the ship’s captain and tells the man at the wheel where to go to stay in deep water. The ship moves in toward the docks with the assistance of tugboats (05:10). The film shows several different kinds of buoys out in the harbor. A big dredging machine dredges the harbor (06:25); sand and rocks are pumped through a pipe and onto land. Viewers see ships as they pass each other in the harbor (07:00). A tugboat pushes the ship sideways to get it next to the dock. A heavy rope is lowered from the ship and is tied to the dock. The harbor pilot stands on another large ship as it leaves port and moves through harbor out to sea. A pilot boat comes out to the ship to get the harbor pilot and take him back to shore (08:59). The harbor pilot stands at the bow of the pilot boat as it moves back to port.A maritime pilot, marine pilot, harbor pilot, bar pilot, or simply pilot, is a sailor who maneuvers ships through dangerous or congested waters, such as harbors or river mouths. They are navigational experts possessing knowledge of the particular waterway such as its depth, currents, and hazards.Normally, the pilot joins an incoming ship prior to the ship's entry into the shallow water at the designated "pilot boarding area" via helicopter or pilot boat and climbs a pilot ladder sometimes up to 40 feet (~12 metres) to the deck of the largest container and tanker ships. Climbing the pilot ladder can be dangerous, even more so in rough seas considering that both the ship to be piloted and the pilot's own vessel are usually both moving. With outgoing vessels, a pilot boat returns the pilot to land after the ship has successfully negotiated coastal waters. The film was made by Arthur Evans, John and Barbara Upton, and Walter Soul, and released by Bailey Films.

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Video AIMPA’s Webinar on “Reconceptualising Indian Maritime Pilotage" on 24th Oct 2020.

Found on YouTube. Created by "Marine-Pilots". Recorded on 2020-10-24.

The need to hold such a webinar was felt from the interaction over several months of AIMPA members through its President, Capt. Gajanan Karanjikar, with Capt Simon Meyjes and Capt.Ravi Nijjer - both instrumental in the thorough upgrade of pilotage operations Safety management systems in parts of Australia. From these interactions, AIMPA has come to the firm conclusion that a thorough upgrade of maritime pilotage management systems in India is necessary. Holding a webinar would be a good start to help bring about such change.

The webinar was held on 24th Oct 2020 on a platform graciously provided by the Institute of Marine Engineers of India (IMEI). Maritime Fraternity supported the event as ‘must have’ and professional bodies like Nautical Institute and company of Master mariners supported the event full-fledged. As contacted with Chirp Maritime UK, their Marine Operations director Mr Jeff Parfitt not only supported the event but also agreed to be one of the speakers.

As many as seven accomplished experts in the field of maritime pilotage management were requested to share their views using short presentations of about 10 minutes each. Two moderators, each a very accomplished maritime professional, were also impanelled.
The intent of the webinar was to spark ideas and opinions which, after some analysis and moderation, could be put up by AIMPA as a set of recommendations for both policies as well as decision makers in India to consider.

The response to the webinar was very encouraging. As many as 500+ persons registered. For students in various maritime training institutes in India as well the wider public too, the webinar proceedings were streamed live via Facebook and Youtube.

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Article IMPA is hosting examples of best practice and protocols during Covid-19 times

by IMPA - International Maritime Pilots’ Association - published

IMPA has published examples of best practice together with a letter from Capt. Simon Pelletier, President of IMPA.

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Article IcePad, Smart download and view satellite images of sea-ice

by Drift + Noise GmbH - published

Download and view satellite images of sea-ice on your mobile device or PC within an intuitive map-based interface.

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Video Corryvreckan Maelstrom & Thunder Child II documentary

Found on YouTube. Created by "Frank Kowalski".

Safehaven Marine undertook an 800nm 4 day cruise in Thunder Child II to Scotland, living off the boat to visit a place called the Gulf of Corryvreckan. A pretty wild yet beautiful place.

The Corryvreckan whirlpool, or ‘Maelstrom’, as would be a more appropriate description, is formed as the tide enters the narrow stretch of water between the Islands of Jura and Scarba that is the Gulf of Corryvreckan. Here the tidal flow speeds up to 8.5kts as it is squeezed between the islands, and there it encounters a variety of underwater seabed features. On the western entrance a basalt pinnacle rises up from depths of 70m to 29m, and lying to East, directly in front of the pinnacle is a deep hole in the seabed, with a depth of 219m.

As the water flows through the gulf it falls into this hole, and then encounters the steep face of the pinnacle, causing a massive upwelling surge of water to rise to the surface. On a flood tide this surge meets swells entering the Gulf from the West, and creates standing waves that can reach heights of 9m. These ‘standing waves’ are not like normal waves as they form directly over the pinnacle, standing still and breaking heavily on the spot. Whirlpools are also formed over the pinnacle as well as throughout the Gulf, as opposing water columns sheer, and these can be up to 50m wide.

During a storm on spring tides it is said that the angry roar from the seething waters of the maelstrom, with its standing waves and whirlpools can be heard up to 10 miles away, and local mythology refers to this as the voice of ‘Cailleach’ (The Hag) of the Whirlpool.

In a well found boat the gulf can be safely navigated in fair conditions, or at slack water, but I can imagine that in a Westerly gale on a flood tide, you wouldn’t want to be anywhere near the place, as it would truly be described as ‘Unnavigable’. Indeed it was once classified as such by the Royal Navy. On the day we visited with Thunder Child we had Westerly winds of Force 5 gusting 6, and a 3.9m tide which enabled us to experience the standing waves on the flood and the whirlpools on the ebb.

The word Corryvreckan translates to ‘Cauldron’ and that perfectly describes the seething sea state around the whirlpools, and it was quite an experience to have the throttles set for 6kts, holding station just ahead of the standing waves that were breaking behind the boat, and not be moving at all!

There is an Old Irish text known as Cormac’s Glossary written by the King and Bishop of Cashel, Cormac mac Cuilennáin who died in the year 908: “There is a great whirlpool which is between Ireland and Scotland to the north, in the meeting of various seas, its thunderous eructation and its bursting and its roaring are heard among the clouds, like the steam boiling of a cauldron of fire.” I felt that was a pretty cool description of the place as how the place might have appeared of old during a storm.

Coryvreckan is reputed to produce the third largest whirlpools after the Saltstraumen and Moskstraumen Maelstroms in Norway, however the unique submarine topography of the gulf of Corryvreckan and its capability to produce dangerous standing waves means that in storm conditions, it is potentially one of the most violent stretches of water in the world.

The Voyage: Casting off at Cobh in the afternoon on Saturday 18th July 2020 Thunder Child II arrived at Bangor marina at 9.30pm for refuelling after averaging 32kts over the 275nm run. Overnighting on aboard we set sail early Sunday morning heading up the Northern Ireland coast to Rathlin Island, itself a place notorious for producing challenging seas with its tidal strong race and overfalls, before a lumpy crossing to Scotland to enjoying two days taking Thunder Child II through the standing waves and whirlpools in the Gulf of Corryvreckan, and capturing some cool Ariel drone video. Whilst we were there It was also nice to see one of our old Interceptor 42 passenger boats ‘Venturer’ for the first time since we built her 15 years ago, and still looking good. Operated by Craignish Cruises running boat tours in the Gulf, they guided us on a tour around the islands visiting the notorious ‘Grey Dogs’ tidal race and seeing the Sea Eagles nesting nearby.

Spending Sunday night isolated on the breakwater at Ardfern marina we headed to Belfast late afternoon on Monday. Next day we were onwards to Dun Laoghaire for lunch and down the East coast of Ireland where we we’re buzzed overhead by Rescue 116 of the Irish Coastguard, which was great to experience and gave us the excuse to give Thunder Child the beans, and although heavy with fuel we still managed to hit over 50kts.

We arrived home to East Ferry Marina, Cobh late Tuesday evening after an enjoyable voyage for her crew comprising: Skipper Frank Kowalski and crew: Carl Randalls (Drone pilot) Ciaran Monks, Mary Power and Kenny Carrol. During the voyage Thunder Child II ran faultlessly and proved her capabilities of averaging high speeds for long distances.

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Video Greek navy HS Kallisto cut in half during collision with Maersk Launceston

Found on YouTube. Created by "Dryad Global".

Ex-RN minehunter (former HMS Berkeley) serving with Greek navy as HS Kallisto cut in half during collision with Maersk containership, Maersk Launceston, a Portuguese-flagged container ship.

Read more: https://channel16.dryadglobal.com/greek-navy-minehunting-vessel-sliced-in-two-by-container-shi

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