Article

Flinders Ports tightens rules regarding pilot ladders from 01.01.2022


published on 27 November 2021 1390 -

Photo taken from YouTube

From 1.1.2022, Flinders Ports will require visiting vessels and their Masters to take additional safety measures related to pilot ladders.

It is a requirement by Flinders Ports that “Pilot Boarding” Arrangements for all ports and other areas where Flinders Ports’ pilots and personnel may board a vessel are to be in accordance with the international regulations.

Due to many incidents involving pilot ladders and man ropes in South Australian ports, and in effort to improve pilot safety, from 1 January 2022 Flinders Ports will require visiting vessels and their Masters to take additional precautions, namely:
  • All Pilot ladders MUST be less than two years in age. Pilots and/or visiting port personnel may ask to see pilot ladder construction certificates.
  • All Man Ropes MUST be made of NATURAL FIBRE such as Manila Rope with dimensions between 28 and 32mm in diameter.
  • All Masters are to fill in the attached checklist for pilot ladder securing and boarding arrangements prior to their arrival to South Australian ports.

AUSTRALIA Nov21 Pilot Ladder Checklist V2 0

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MH
Manjit Handa Australia
on 2 December 2021, 15:45 UTC

"All Pilot ladders MUST be less than two years in age"
This singular step will go a long way in improving the state of pilot ladders.
I have always argued that despite the best care of pilot ladders on board, there is a finite period beyond which manila rope will deteriorate.

A related issue is the stowage of pilot ladders on board. We have to improve a lot in this aspect. If a pilot ladder is not on the reel, it is subjected to dragging and stowage on makeshift platforms without sufficient cover. A canvas cover is not a proper cover, it is just a way of ignoring a problem.
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AR
Adam Roberts Australasian Marine Pilots Institute, Australia
on 27 November 2021, 17:14 UTC

It demonstrates the lack of attention given by ships and at times financial resource given by owners to this safety and commercially critical task.
Personally I am happy to see port companies saying enough and going down this road. Sadly it is normal to expect some level of non compliance with IMO regulations or ISO standards for pilot boarding arrangements.
No doubt there will be plenty in the industry complaining about it going beyond “the requirements of solas” and whine about “replacing perfectly good ladders” to which I say tough luck mate get on with it.

If it were my call ladders would be replaced annually. ISO799-1:2019 requirement for ladders to be strength tested every 30 months goes some of the way to getting ladders replaced more often. Ie it would be cheaper to replace them than bother landing them for testing. Also any inspection of a used pilot ladder would in my view lead to it being condemned rather than recertified.


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A community member on 27 November 2021, 17:14 UTC

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A community member on 27 November 2021, 17:14 UTC

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A community member on 27 November 2021, 17:14 UTC

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