Article

Turkish Chief officer fell into water checking draft, died, Russia


published on 6 February 2022 284 -

Text and photo by Fleetmon (link to original article)

Chief officer of bulk carrier İNCE EGE fell into water from pilot ladder while trying to read draft marks at Taman port, Russia, Black sea, understood early in the morning Feb 4, at nigh time. He was rescued 45 minutes later, but neither crew, no port paramedic, who was transported by tug, were able to resuscitate him, he, unfortunately, died. Understood the main cause of his death was hypothermia.

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