"Ship's Pilot" - A poem by Gaylen K. Bunker

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A wonderful poem
As read by the author
From his books "Poems"

Sometimes it is good just to stop and enjoy a poem. This poem "Ship's Pilot" is read by the author himself.
A valuable piece about the nature of the pilot.

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Article "Ship's Pilot" - A poem by Gaylen K. Bunker

by Frank Diegel, CEO Marine-Pilots.com - published

A wonderful poem by Gaylen K. Bunker found on YouTube. As read by the author from bis book "Poems".

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Video "The Port Pilot" by Richard Blanco - Read by Tom Wilson

The Port Pilot, by Richard Blanco. In _Looking for The Gulf Motel_, 2012, University of Pittsburgh Press.

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Article Pilots and ship´s Captains

by Marine Pilot Luis Vale, Portugal - published

Lately there has been a considerable increase in opinions of seagoing ship´s masters complaining about pilotage services, expressed whether as LinkedIn articles and comments or in some reputable industry magazines.

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Video Construction of Panama Canal from 1908 and 1914 in color! Part-1

Found on YouTube. Created by "Rick88888888".
Spectacular (silent) film footage of the construction of the Panama Canal more than a century ago.
The film shows the construction of the Miraflores and Gatun locks in detail as well as the digging of "The Culebra Cut" including steam trains, steam shovels and steam dredgers at work and scenes of the locks an the Canal in its first days op operation in 1914.

Wikipedia: The Panama Canal (Spanish: Canal de Panamá) is an artificial 82 km (51 miles) waterway in Panama that connects the Atlantic Ocean with the Pacific Ocean. The canal cuts across the Isthmus of Panama and is a conduit for maritime trade. Canal locks are at each end to lift ships up to Gatun Lake, an artificial lake created to reduce the amount of excavation work required for the canal, 26 m (85 ft) above sea level, and then lower the ships at the other end. The original locks, "Miraflores" in the South and "Gatun locks" in the North, are 32.5 m (110 ft) wide.

France began work on the canal in 1881, but stopped because of engineering problems and a high worker mortality rate, caused by malaria and yellow fever. The United States took over the project in 1904 and opened the canal on August 15, 1914. One of the largest and most difficult engineering projects ever undertaken, the Panama Canal shortcut greatly reduced the time for ships to travel between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, enabling them to avoid the lengthy, hazardous Cape Horn route around the southernmost tip of South America via the Drake Passage or Strait of Magellan and the even less popular route through the Arctic Archipelago and the Bering Strait.

Thse footage has been motion-stabilized, speed-corrected, contrast- and brightness enhanced, de-noised, restored, upscaled and colorized by means of state-of-the-art AI sofware.
It took over a month to restore and colorize all available footage, our largest project ever!

This restored film is without sound. The reason is the difficulty to find near one hour of suitable music.

Please help to improve this draft Timeline:
00:00 Miraflores Locks in the South
02:10 Steam shovels in "The Cut"
02:26 West Indian workers drill holes in the rock for explosives
03:44 Not every explosion goes as it should...
04:18 Workers along the railway line
05:40 Steam shovels at work
10:10 Steam trains remove the rocks
11:42 Another blast
12:50 Views from a high point of "The Cut"
14:10 The railway tracks
15:07 Freight trains pass a check point
15:50 Special trains push earth and rocks aside
16:47 Close up view of a special train in action
18:21 West Indian workers shift the railway tracks
19:15 Workers climb up the mountain
20:22 Fresh workers arrive by steam train
21:38 Another day ahead for the workers and the steam shovels
24:22 Shifting a huge drum
24:45 More steam shovels at work
25:16 Steam trains with special equipment
25:58 Workers removing rails
26:30 Gatun locks in the North still under construction
26:52 Flooded rain forest forming Gatun Lake
27:19 The huge lock doors have been installed
27:28 Testing floading the locks
28:48 A lock filling up
29:10 Small ships enter the lock
30:05 A train ride along the canal
30:38 Preparing to blow up the last dam
31:07 Spectators gather for the blasting of the last dam
31:58 Opening a huge valve
32:42 Blasting of the last dam
33:18 Water flows into the Canal
33:27 Dredgers enter the Canal
33:44 More blasting along the Canal
34:20 Gatun locks open
35:32 Numerous ships enter the locks
37:10 The next lock chamber opens
38:46 Small boat with dignatories on the Canal
40:33 Views of the Canal and Gatun Lake
41:05 Dredgers at work to deepen the Canal
41:36 More lock views
43:03 Busy scenes at the locks
43:52 Spectators on the opening lock doors
46:01 A pilot rowing boat on its way to receive the ropes of a ship
46:42 Inner lock chamber scenes
47:45 Lock doors opening
48:49 Ship leaving the locks
49:13 More steam dredgers at work
50:02 Close up view of an active steam dredger
50:36 Rubble is released through the bottom of a barge into the lake
51:18 Flushing rubble away with a watercanon
52:40 Dredgers seen from a high viewpoint
53:52 Final views of the Canal

In view of the amount of available enhanced footage, Part-2 will follow shortly!

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Video Losingsforsøk Rekefjord / Maritime pilotage 02 07 2016

Found on YouTube. Created by "kystverketWEB".

Spektakulært forsøk. Vanskelig losoppdrag.
Svært fartøy. Trang fjordpassasje.
#Kystverket #lostjenesten #sikkerseilas/

Spectacular attempt. Demanding maritime pilotage.
Huge vessel. Narrow passage.
#norwegaincoastaladministration #safeseaways

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Video A day in the life of the Briggs Marine Pilot Launch Vessels

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Video Chifting from quai marinelle To berth 12

Video showing marine pilot navigating a cargo ship from Plan du Port

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Video ProZero 9m P-Top crew transfer

The boat is specially designed for transport of up to 12 passengers and 2 crewat high speeds. Sheltered steering position with full enclosed front, raises the comfort onboard. The boat is significantly lighter than the market average which benefits fuel consumption and adds to the already proven seaworthiness. 9m ProZero P-top crew boat is designed for quick and safe transfer mission of personel and cargo. The boat is built in light-weight materials to decrease weight and enhance mission time.

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Video OMC International - Suezmax Tanker - Case Study

Case Study: An investigation into whether Port of Melbourne and major port user, ExxonMobil, could bring deeper drafted vessels into the channel.

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Video AIS Track APL MEXICO CITY - Accident in Antwerp on 09.12.2019

Found on YouTube. Created by "Marine-Pilots". Recorded on 2019-12-09.

Video AIS Track by Nolan Dragon - www.MarineTraffic.com

What had happened:
Container ship APL MEXICO CITY broke off her mooring at Doel, Antwerp, in the afternoon Dec 9, drifted across harbor and contacted DP World pier crane. Crane collapsed and was totally destroyed. No injures reported.

Cause of the accident (according to the report from FEBIMA):
"The allision of the mv APL MEXICO CITY with a gantry crane at the Port of Antwerp on 9 December 2019 stemmed from exceptional meteorological conditions and the not availability of tugboats to assist the vessel in remaining alongside as requested by the Master, that have lead to the breaking of seven mooring hawsers on the foreship of the vessel.

Subsequently, in order to gain control over the vessel and prevent damages the main engine of the ship was put ahead. All mooring hawsers at the stern of the vessel broke. The vessel subsequently sailed/drifted onto the gantry crane at the opposite side of the Deurganckdok thereby destroying it. The falling jib of the crane damaged the ship’s hull and propeller, rendering the vessel no longer seaworthy. In the further drifting/sailing onto the river Scheldt, a buoy and dolphin were damaged/destroyed."

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