Efficient and safe harbour towage operations

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Video Timelapse: ship departs Newcastle Harbour, NSW

Found on YouTube. Created by "Port Authority of New South Wales"

Timelapse: watch our marine pilot assist the vessel Ocean Prometheus as it departs Newcastle Harbour, NSW

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Port Authority of New South Wales manages the navigation, security and operational safety needs of commercial shipping in Sydney Harbour, Port Botany, Newcastle Harbour, Port Kembla, Eden and Yamba.

With over 6,000 visits from trade and cruise vessels each year, the ports of New South Wales contribute billions of dollars to our economy; create thousands of jobs and support countless businesses.

Port Authority works 24/7 to ensure the safety of these ships, the security of our working ports and the protection of our marine environment.

Across six ports, Port Authority delivers safe and efficient marine and maritime services, including harbour masters; marine pilotage; aids to navigation; vessel traffic services; emergency response; hydrographic surveying; port management and cruise terminal operations.

Port Authority of New South Wales keeps our ports safe, secure and open to the world.

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• Find out more at www.portauthoritynsw.com.au

• Follow us @portauthoritynsw on Instagram and LinkedIn

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Video Ships in Freeport of Riga

Ships in Freeport of Riga

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Video Johor Port Marine Pilot

Found on YouTube. Created by Fathullah Elham.

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Article Interview with Marine Pilot Esil Abibula: Crossing the Northwest Passage

by Marine-Pilots.com - published

The Northwest Passage is the approximately 5780 km long sea route that connects the Atlantic Ocean with the Pacific Ocean north of the American continent. It crosses the Arctic Ocean and its marginal seas as well as the associated sea lanes through the Canadian-Arctic archipel ago.

Roald Amundsen made his first complete successfully crossing in 1903-1906 via the route discovered by John Rae through the James Ross Strait, Rae Strait and Simpson Strait on the small ship Gjøa.

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Video Construction of Panama Canal from 1908 and 1914 in color! Part-1

Found on YouTube. Created by "Rick88888888".
Spectacular (silent) film footage of the construction of the Panama Canal more than a century ago.
The film shows the construction of the Miraflores and Gatun locks in detail as well as the digging of "The Culebra Cut" including steam trains, steam shovels and steam dredgers at work and scenes of the locks an the Canal in its first days op operation in 1914.

Wikipedia: The Panama Canal (Spanish: Canal de Panamá) is an artificial 82 km (51 miles) waterway in Panama that connects the Atlantic Ocean with the Pacific Ocean. The canal cuts across the Isthmus of Panama and is a conduit for maritime trade. Canal locks are at each end to lift ships up to Gatun Lake, an artificial lake created to reduce the amount of excavation work required for the canal, 26 m (85 ft) above sea level, and then lower the ships at the other end. The original locks, "Miraflores" in the South and "Gatun locks" in the North, are 32.5 m (110 ft) wide.

France began work on the canal in 1881, but stopped because of engineering problems and a high worker mortality rate, caused by malaria and yellow fever. The United States took over the project in 1904 and opened the canal on August 15, 1914. One of the largest and most difficult engineering projects ever undertaken, the Panama Canal shortcut greatly reduced the time for ships to travel between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, enabling them to avoid the lengthy, hazardous Cape Horn route around the southernmost tip of South America via the Drake Passage or Strait of Magellan and the even less popular route through the Arctic Archipelago and the Bering Strait.

Thse footage has been motion-stabilized, speed-corrected, contrast- and brightness enhanced, de-noised, restored, upscaled and colorized by means of state-of-the-art AI sofware.
It took over a month to restore and colorize all available footage, our largest project ever!

This restored film is without sound. The reason is the difficulty to find near one hour of suitable music.

Please help to improve this draft Timeline:
00:00 Miraflores Locks in the South
02:10 Steam shovels in "The Cut"
02:26 West Indian workers drill holes in the rock for explosives
03:44 Not every explosion goes as it should...
04:18 Workers along the railway line
05:40 Steam shovels at work
10:10 Steam trains remove the rocks
11:42 Another blast
12:50 Views from a high point of "The Cut"
14:10 The railway tracks
15:07 Freight trains pass a check point
15:50 Special trains push earth and rocks aside
16:47 Close up view of a special train in action
18:21 West Indian workers shift the railway tracks
19:15 Workers climb up the mountain
20:22 Fresh workers arrive by steam train
21:38 Another day ahead for the workers and the steam shovels
24:22 Shifting a huge drum
24:45 More steam shovels at work
25:16 Steam trains with special equipment
25:58 Workers removing rails
26:30 Gatun locks in the North still under construction
26:52 Flooded rain forest forming Gatun Lake
27:19 The huge lock doors have been installed
27:28 Testing floading the locks
28:48 A lock filling up
29:10 Small ships enter the lock
30:05 A train ride along the canal
30:38 Preparing to blow up the last dam
31:07 Spectators gather for the blasting of the last dam
31:58 Opening a huge valve
32:42 Blasting of the last dam
33:18 Water flows into the Canal
33:27 Dredgers enter the Canal
33:44 More blasting along the Canal
34:20 Gatun locks open
35:32 Numerous ships enter the locks
37:10 The next lock chamber opens
38:46 Small boat with dignatories on the Canal
40:33 Views of the Canal and Gatun Lake
41:05 Dredgers at work to deepen the Canal
41:36 More lock views
43:03 Busy scenes at the locks
43:52 Spectators on the opening lock doors
46:01 A pilot rowing boat on its way to receive the ropes of a ship
46:42 Inner lock chamber scenes
47:45 Lock doors opening
48:49 Ship leaving the locks
49:13 More steam dredgers at work
50:02 Close up view of an active steam dredger
50:36 Rubble is released through the bottom of a barge into the lake
51:18 Flushing rubble away with a watercanon
52:40 Dredgers seen from a high viewpoint
53:52 Final views of the Canal

In view of the amount of available enhanced footage, Part-2 will follow shortly!

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Video Cosco Shipping Galaxy breaks away from Felixstowe as showers passes through. 11th October 2020

Found on YouTube. Created by "Deano C".
The Cosco Shipping Galaxy alongside Felixstowe Berth 9 cargo operations come to an end with the cranes beginning to boom up. Mooring gang in attendance and the tugs begin to go to station. The pilot requests for both to make fast on the centre lead fore and aft. Svitzer Kent makes fast centre lead aft while the Svitzer Sky makes fast centre lead forward. The Sky comes under the bow to pick up the heaving line but the crew slackens the head lines before the last crane had boomed up. Sky manages to get the heaving line so they tie their gear onto the line to be winched onboard onto the bollard. One of the crew members signals to the Sky to say they were fast forward. Kent makes fast aft once a couple of lines were let go.

The pilot gives the order to single up to springs. Once VTS had given clearance to depart, the springs were released and Kent builds to a 50% pull away from the quay, Sky forward builds to 50% aswell before the Kent increases to full power. After a while, the pilot gets the Sky to go all easy.

As the Galaxy moves away from the berth box, the pilot runs the engine astern to back her further into the channel. The pilot begins to use the bow thrusters and then gets the Sky to build to a full pull to get the bow onto a southerly heading. Kent drops in astern as the pilot runs the engine ahead, Sky eases and comes in to let go from forward.

Once the Sky had been released they move around to the port quarter to escort around them around the corner if the Galaxy got into difficulty. Safely around the Corner both tugs were released.

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Opinion Five questions for Porthos Lima, Rio de Janeiro Pilots Operations Director

published

In our new new section “Five questions for ..." Marine-Pilots.com introduces pilots and other market players to our readers in short interviews.

Today we have talked to Porthos Lima, Rio de Janeiro Pilots Operations Director.

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Article Blackcomb Helicopters doing precision work

published

Video from Rob Munday Hoist Operator/Instructor at Blackcomb Helicopters & SR3 Rescue Concepts

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Article Rio de Janeiro Pilots have a new president

by Marine-Pilots.com - published

Everton Schmidt assumed the position with the commitment to maintain the activities during the new coronavirus pandemic.

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Video How Ship Anchor Works? - Procedure For Anchoring a Ship at Sea

Found on YouTube. Created by "marineinsight".

#Anchor #shipanchor #windlass
Anchoring is one of the very frequent operations onboard ships. A number of variables and external factors influence the duration and location of an anchoring operation. While the type of seabed is of utmost importance during anchoring, soft muddy grounds or clay bottoms are best preferred. It should be taken care that the anchoring bottom is free of power lines, submarine cables, pipelines or rocks.

Various methods on anchoring include consideration of direction and strength of wind, current and tidal stream. Often good local knowledge helps a mariner determine required manoeuvres and actions to be taken while anchoring.

This operations comes under the responsibility of deck officers. It involves the use of critical shipboard equipment and requires high level of situational awareness. The key responsibility of the deck officer at an anchor station is to use the anchoring machinery and available man power for carrying out the operation safely and efficiently in accordance with the master’s instructions.

In most of the cases, theoretical guidelines and bookish knowledge are helpful only to an extent. Situational awareness and spontaneity of the officers, and their instant decision making capability helps to carry out the operation fruitfully. A good knowledge of ship’s maneuverability and the limitation of the equipment involved will further help the officer to make such spontaneous decisions. The competency of the officer is decided upon his ability to consider the situation, command his crew and to assess the orders give by the Master, to carry out the operation safely and efficiently.

Read: 9 Points to Remember When Dropping Ship Anchor in Emergency - https://www.marineinsight.com/guidelines/9-points-remember-dropping-ship-anchor-emergency/

Video Credit: https://www.youtube.com/user/neo5362/
Movie Clip Credit: Caddyshack
Image Credit: http://bit.ly/2VmUB6R

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