Article

Command or Control?


by Capt. Gürhan Aktürk - published on 27 October 2019 1159

Command or Control?

“Piloting the vessels was there since there was a sea transportation”
This is one of the most popular and might be most proud phrase for pilots. During the maritime history, piloting the vessels evolved in many aspects, however main core is never changed; trustworthy colleague from neighbourhood will be close by for safe passage.

The improvement of pilotage brought many different rules, regulations, customs and traditions to regulate those services offered by trustworthy colleagues. The regulation of pilotage and the role of the pilot and his/her relationship with the master is complex and not easy to describe accurately in a few sentences.

Besides the legal base of pilotage, undoubtedly pilot is one of the main member of Bridge Team and master is the team leader and has right to command his/her vessel. This is fair enough; hence, master has all responsibility for his/her vessel when pilotage is being carry out.  Well, then Pilot? As a consultant, advisor, guide -the list can be extended- pilot has no right to command vessel but definitely he/she has right to control pilotage. Controlling pilotage covers complete cooperation of each elements such as tugboat(s) and mooring boat(s), human resources involved in and vessel!

Would like to share my experience. Upon embarkation, I did best to join Bridge Team and completely willing to carry out pre-berthing toolbox meeting. Reviewed the pilot card and Master-Pilot information exchange form presented to me. Then the master requested me to review his company’s circular concerning approach course and speed specified for our berth. The circular has issued because of the one of the fleet vessel had an undesirable experience at same berth and was requiring the attention of masters. Certainly, experience sharing is important and valuable as a lesson-learnt tool. The thing is circular was requiring masters to follow approach course and speed exactly mentioned in for berthing, however weather and current conditions have not taken into account by the company. That time master of the vessel was ready to cooperate in course of safe berthing, he deserves respect but he was also intend to comply company circular. He had the command of vessel and I had the control of Pilotage.

At the end of the story, by taking into account the prevailing weather conditions and current, we agreed on the approach course and speed, which was different from mentioned in circular and vessel safely berthed.

This is complex relationship and clearly can be say there is grey zone between commanding of vessel and controlling of the pilotage. That is why we need to think more about; is the mutual cooperation and respect between the Master of the vessel and the Pilot sufficient for safe pilotage?

 

 

Capt. Gürhan AKTÜRK

After his sea career as Class-1 Master on Crude Carriers, he worked on Safety and Quality Systems as an auditor.

Capt. Aktürk is presently Secretary General of Turkish Maritime Pilots’ Association and working as a Sea Pilot in İzmit Bay/Turkey.

What's your opinion on this?
Login or register to write comments and join the discussion!
Read more...

Article Pilots and ship´s Captains

by Marine Pilot Luis Vale, Portugal - published on 23 August 2019

Lately there has been a considerable increase in opinions of seagoing ship´s masters complaining about pilotage services, expressed whether as LinkedIn articles and comments or in some reputable industry magazines.

1

Article The scariest 15 minutes of my life

by Marine-Pilots.com - published on 14 August 2019

An authentic report by Marine Pilot Capt. Agha Umar Habib (Port of Sohar, Oman) about a dramatic incident on July 23, 2019.

1

Article Who is a Marine Pilot? Comment by Reshma Nilofer Naha

by Marine-Pilots.com - published on 16 September 2019

Comment and photos by Reshma Nilofer Naha
India's first female Marine Pilot (Kalkata Port Trust)

0

Opinion Interrupting the Error Chain - The importance of SOPs in piloting

by Captain Reginaldo Pantoja AFNI - published on 26 September 2020

Captain Reginaldo Pantoja, AFNI: "Now, as a professional harbour pilot for over 29 years, I try to apply the lessons I learned during these times and also when I worked as a mooring master, tow master, and dock master."

3

Video Volvo Penta – Mighty Jobs – Piloting the Arctic seas of Norway

In this episode of Mighty Jobs we meet the piloting crew of Buksér og Berging in Tromsø, Norway. Their Volvo Penta-powered piloting boat covers around 42,000 nautical miles every year. That’s the equivalent of traveling around the world twice. The Volvo Penta IPS system makes it possible to pilot ships under all weather conditions.

0

Article National Transportation Safety Board Releases Report Detailing 2018 Allision At Louisiana’s Sunshine Bridge

published on 13 August 2020

On October 11, 2018, the Kristin Alexis was performing fleeting work with a crew of six, including a captain, pilot, and four deckhands (two per shift), at the Cooper Consolidated fleeting facility at Convent located at mile 161.5. About 2300, the Cooper Consolidated dispatcher informed the Kristin Alexis captain that their next job was to move the derrick-type crane barge Mr Ervin upriver to the Cooper Consolidated fleeting facility in Darrow, located at mile 175.

0

Article In Memoriam of Captain Dennis R. Sherwood (1955 - 2019)

by Bianca Reineke, lutheran Pastor, Germany - published on 3 January 2020

Ladders are the bridges for crossing the rough seas of our lives.
When you are a Marine Pilot at work, hoping and praying that the ladders which let you embark the vessel are stable, safe and not dangerous.
In Memoriam of the late Captain Dennis Sherwood who passed away on Monday the 30th of December.

1

Video Dublin Port People - Robbie Cox - Marine Operative on Pilot Boat

As part of our Port Perspectives series we have captured the perspective of what is like to work in Dublin Port from some key members of our team. This video features Robert Cox, a Marine Operative at Dublin Port Company. Robbie as he is better known provides an insight into his varied role at the Port from operating Pilot Boat Camac, delivering Pilots safely to vessels, to placing fenders at the quay wall no two days are ever the same! Robbie also captures some amazing images of Dublin...

0

Video Bangkok Port - Pilot

Explore working hours with Pilot 130 at Bangkok port, Thailand.

0