St Johns Bar Pilot Association

published -
283

Region: USA
Categories:
Experiences · Pilot boarding

A collection of action from the St Johns Bar Pilot Association

In the early 1800′s as the commercial ports along the St Johns River began to develop, a select group of brave and skilled seafarers would row to sea to meet arriving cargo sailing ships. These daring individuals would use their extensive local knowledge to safely guide the sailing ships across the treacherous sand bars that guarded the river entrance. This was the origin of the St. Johns Bar Pilots. Initially it was a bit of a free-for-all as competition was keen among these pilots to be first to “call for the ship” and claim the right to pilot the ships in and out of port.

In 1890, an enterprising pilot, Captain George Spaulding, purchased a former America’s Cup contender, the schooner “META”. Understandably very fast, Captain Spaulding and the META were soon winning the majority of “Calls” for the St. Johns River. At the urging of the other pilots, Captain Spaulding sold shares in the META and created the St. Johns Bar Pilot Association in the fall of 1890. The META became the first official St. Johns Pilot Boat.

The daily assigned pilot would board META at dawn and take station outside the mouth of the river. After a day of working on the river, the pilots would return to the river mouth just before sunset. In 1931, a Richfield Oil Tanker was the first vessel to navigate the river at night, thereby ushering in a new era of commercial service for arrivals and departures.

The first real pilot station was a pair of wooden buildings built on a low spit of land that formed Ribault Bay. That land is now under the carrier piers at Naval Station Mayport, and Ribault Bay is now known as the Naval basin. The station was moved to its current location with the construction of the Navy base in the 1940s.

For more than 120 years, the traditions of safety and excellence in service have been passed from one Pilot to the next. All of the modern St. Johns Bar Pilots hold unlimited endorsements as First Class Pilot and have extensive leadership experience from their prior service at sea. Pilots are available at anytime, day or night, and often board and pilot vessels in the most frightening conditions of wind, seas, rain and fog. They are among the most intensely trained and experienced mariners in the world. The Pilot’s dedication to serve the marine transportation interests of the port of Jacksonville are in keeping with their mantra:

“providing pilotage for vessels utilizing the navigable waters of the St. Johns River in order that resources, the environment, life and property may be protected to the fullest extent possible”

St. Johns Bar Pilot Association

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Article Pilots Corner – A perspective from New Zealand

by Chirp Maritime - published

The next step for NZMPA is to issue a set of regulator-endorsed guidance notes. The first version will focus on accommodation ladders used in conjunction with pilot ladders.

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Video Crazy Pilot Boarding when the vessel is rolling heavy

What a dangerous situation. Never seen that before.

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Video Pilot Vessel "DELTA CHARLIE", Rio de la Plata

Found on YouTube 04/03/20. created by @ultrabarqueros / Barqueros de Ultramar

Pilot Vessel "DELTA CHARLIE" Arriving at #Recalada #BoardingStation #KM239,1 #PuntaIndioChannel #RioDeLaPlata #Argentina

This video shows the moment when the Pilot Vessel "DELTA CHARLIE" was arriving at #BoardingPoint #Recalada to embark the Rio de la Plata #Pilots.

You can watch the full video by clicking on the following Link: / Puedes ver el video apretando en el siguiente Link: https://youtu.be/dCEQcDkgsj8

Special appreciation to the Master of the unknown Ship, his Officers and the rest of his Crew.
Special thanks to the Skipper of the Pilot Vessel "DELTA CHARLIE" and all Crew.
Special thanks to the Rio de la Plata Pilot, Mr. Matías CAMARERO and Mr. Pablo LEDESMA.

Date: 17th. March 2020.
Time: 16:26 hours (Local Time).

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Video How Biggest Ship Crosses STRAIT OF GIBRALTAR in bad weather | Navigation Bridge Of Ship |

Found on YouTube. Created by "Karanvir Singh Nayyar".

This video includes how we transit STRAIT OF GIBRALTAR on the biggest ship in the world (EMMA MAERSK)
I have included some bridge procedures we are required to carry out PRE-ARRIVAL and how MASTER-PILOT exchange is carried out .

For aspiring sailors , do watch the whole video as you will learn how life at sea works , the challenges we face and the pros and cons of merchant navy .

I conduct Q&A session on my Instagram account, so don't forget to follow me there too

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Video German Pilots embarking cruise vessel by SWATH Pilot Boat Döse

Found on YouTube. Created by "Strumble".

Recording of cruise ship Pilots boarding from boat at speed

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Video Harbor Pilot Disembarking at Bar Pilot Station Liverpool UK

After almost four hours of work to safely guide and assist the Ship's Captain in navigating the vessel out from Liverpool's Royal Seaforth Container/Roro Terminal (RSCT) in Liverpool UK, the Harbor Pilot disembarks at Bar Pilot Station, a rendezvous point or certain place where a ship should take the Sea/River/Harbor Pilot on and off. In this video, the Pilot disembarked at the Starboard side (right side), lee side of the vessel which is the normal practice. The term "lee side" means away or that is sheltered from the wind. The vessel should slow down and maneuver safely to place the vessel to the lee side. Pilots usually advised the Captain of the approximate speed and heading required for this critical phase of ship handling and operation. The ship Captain, being the top in command, is on the bridge navigation deck to oversee, handle and assess safe operation. Good communication is a vital key to this operation. He/She should communicate with the Deck Officer in order for the Deck Ratings to prepare all the equipment and of course the "Pilot ladder" for safe disembarkation. The Captain should communicate with the Pilot boat as well. He/she should also confirm with the Deck Officer that the ladder has been properly checked and rigged as per instruction/recommendation from the Pilot. He/She should also communicate with the Engine room that the Pilot is about to disembark, and upon leaving the vessel, the Deck Officer should report to the Captain that the Pilot has safely disembarked, take note of the time as this is usually included in some of the ship reporting which is to be done later on, the Captain notifies the Engine room of the actual time of Pilot disembarkation. After a safe Pilot disembarkation, the Deck Ratings should secure the Pilot ladder for sea passage, other equipment used and also the Pilot door opening, if there is any. All of this operation should be done with the utmost care, as SAFETY is the top priority onboard.

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Opinion Piloting in the Corona Era - Understanding differences in COVID-19 mitigating procedures

by Herman Broers - Rotterdam / Netherlands - published

As the world struggles with the Covid-19 virus, the maritime world is being hit hard, not only economically, but also socially and operationally. Iin shipping there are no borders.

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Article Rio de Janeiro Pilots have a new president

by Marine-Pilots.com - published

Everton Schmidt assumed the position with the commitment to maintain the activities during the new coronavirus pandemic.

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Video River Pilot. Unmooring & mooring vessel operation. Safe approaching terminal.

Shifting a vessel from one harbor to other. Easy and safe maneuver. Turn area D=150m. Mooring area 110m.

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Video Pilot leaves the Regent Seven Seas Navigator at Halifax

Found on YouTube. Created by "Jim Kunze".

Pilot leaves the Regent Seven Seas Navigator at Halifax

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