Suez Canal Timelapse | Life at Sea on a Container Ship

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Region: Suez Canal
Categories:
Experiences

Tag along as we journey through Suez Canal into Mediterranean Sea.
The ship is on a 77 days voyage from Asia to East Coast United States in which we've taken the Suez Canal route. By using Suez Canal instead of around cape of Africa, this will save more than 5000 miles of fuel and time.

The time-lapse was taken over 16 hours.

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Video 24/7 Live Webcam - Duluth Canal

Found on YouTube. Created by "Duluth Harbor Cam".
From atop the Lake Superior Maritime Visitor Center in Duluth, these cameras provide one of the most intimate views of Duluth's Aerial Lift Bridge and Shipping Canal. Watch ships from around the world arrive and depart the Twin Ports as they traverse the cold waters of Lake Superior. The cameras are owned by the Corps of Engineers' Lake Superior Maritime Visitor Center https://www.lsmma.com with funding from visitors like you. (camera operations provided by Dennis O'Hara northernimages.com). More live streams on this channel and http://duluthharborcam.com

Ship schedules and a boat location map can be found at: https://harborlookout.com

Marine Scanner: https://www.broadcastify.com/listen/feed/28454

News and weather agencies may record and re-stream for broadcast with credit to duluthharborcam.com

All other recording, duplication, distribution or re-streaming Duluth Harborcam content for commercial purposes is strictly prohibited without prior consent of Duluth Harborcam. Photos and short video clips are allowed for personal use.

Live Chat will be available from 6 am to 6 pm CDT (06:00-18:00)(April-September). Chat may be extended depending on boat traffic.

We have a group of very knowledgeable and respectful Moderators that can help you out with questions.

CHAT Rules of the Road:
• Be polite and respectful, treat others as you would like to be treated.
• Use English, we need a single language to be able to understand each other. If you’re not fluent, please use a translator such as Google Translate: https://translate.google.com/
• Don’t post in ALL CAPS or use excessive emojis, letters or characters.
• Don’t discuss politics, religion, race, sex, violence, bodily functions, or anything like that. Be mindful as there may be children watching.

THINGS THAT WILL GET YOU BANNED:
• Inappropriate usernames
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• Asking for subscriptions (subs)
• Being intentionally disruptive, creating arguments or any other inappropriate behavior
• Constant complaining
• Not following the moderators’ instructions
• Please keep conversations of personal issues (medical, domestic, legal, etc.) out of the chat; take it to messaging or email. Remember, you are a guest here.

Weather Service - Visitors may request current weather form an automated server by typing in !weather

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Opinion Piloting, Autonomous Vessels, AI, and the coffee making machine

by Captain Ricardo Caballero "Themaritimepilot" - published

I am not a computer savvy. My knowledge in programming and robotics and those sort of things is nil. I get lost in the sea of social media and easily entangle myself in the web. All I have done for the last 25 years or so is to pilot ships through the Panama Canal. However, during the last couple of years I have done my best to catch up with technology, since it has enhanced our possibilities and improved safety in our field. But still, I have to admit that I am way behind the new guys in this important issue.

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Video OMC International - Suezmax Tanker - Case Study

Case Study: An investigation into whether Port of Melbourne and major port user, ExxonMobil, could bring deeper drafted vessels into the channel.

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Article A contempt for pilot safety and total disregard for the contents of the SOLAS Convention.

by Captain Kevin Vallance MNI - published

Tuesday, October 1st is the start date of the latest International Maritime Pilot Association's annual Safety Campaign.

Previous campaigns by the association have consistently shown results of pilot ladder deficiencies around the 20% mark.

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Video Batangas Harbor Pilot on call - From home to work

Found on YouTube. Creted by Capt.Harold Janda.

From home to work.

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Video Construction of Panama Canal from 1908 and 1914 in color! Part-1

Found on YouTube. Created by "Rick88888888".
Spectacular (silent) film footage of the construction of the Panama Canal more than a century ago.
The film shows the construction of the Miraflores and Gatun locks in detail as well as the digging of "The Culebra Cut" including steam trains, steam shovels and steam dredgers at work and scenes of the locks an the Canal in its first days op operation in 1914.

Wikipedia: The Panama Canal (Spanish: Canal de Panamá) is an artificial 82 km (51 miles) waterway in Panama that connects the Atlantic Ocean with the Pacific Ocean. The canal cuts across the Isthmus of Panama and is a conduit for maritime trade. Canal locks are at each end to lift ships up to Gatun Lake, an artificial lake created to reduce the amount of excavation work required for the canal, 26 m (85 ft) above sea level, and then lower the ships at the other end. The original locks, "Miraflores" in the South and "Gatun locks" in the North, are 32.5 m (110 ft) wide.

France began work on the canal in 1881, but stopped because of engineering problems and a high worker mortality rate, caused by malaria and yellow fever. The United States took over the project in 1904 and opened the canal on August 15, 1914. One of the largest and most difficult engineering projects ever undertaken, the Panama Canal shortcut greatly reduced the time for ships to travel between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, enabling them to avoid the lengthy, hazardous Cape Horn route around the southernmost tip of South America via the Drake Passage or Strait of Magellan and the even less popular route through the Arctic Archipelago and the Bering Strait.

Thse footage has been motion-stabilized, speed-corrected, contrast- and brightness enhanced, de-noised, restored, upscaled and colorized by means of state-of-the-art AI sofware.
It took over a month to restore and colorize all available footage, our largest project ever!

This restored film is without sound. The reason is the difficulty to find near one hour of suitable music.

Please help to improve this draft Timeline:
00:00 Miraflores Locks in the South
02:10 Steam shovels in "The Cut"
02:26 West Indian workers drill holes in the rock for explosives
03:44 Not every explosion goes as it should...
04:18 Workers along the railway line
05:40 Steam shovels at work
10:10 Steam trains remove the rocks
11:42 Another blast
12:50 Views from a high point of "The Cut"
14:10 The railway tracks
15:07 Freight trains pass a check point
15:50 Special trains push earth and rocks aside
16:47 Close up view of a special train in action
18:21 West Indian workers shift the railway tracks
19:15 Workers climb up the mountain
20:22 Fresh workers arrive by steam train
21:38 Another day ahead for the workers and the steam shovels
24:22 Shifting a huge drum
24:45 More steam shovels at work
25:16 Steam trains with special equipment
25:58 Workers removing rails
26:30 Gatun locks in the North still under construction
26:52 Flooded rain forest forming Gatun Lake
27:19 The huge lock doors have been installed
27:28 Testing floading the locks
28:48 A lock filling up
29:10 Small ships enter the lock
30:05 A train ride along the canal
30:38 Preparing to blow up the last dam
31:07 Spectators gather for the blasting of the last dam
31:58 Opening a huge valve
32:42 Blasting of the last dam
33:18 Water flows into the Canal
33:27 Dredgers enter the Canal
33:44 More blasting along the Canal
34:20 Gatun locks open
35:32 Numerous ships enter the locks
37:10 The next lock chamber opens
38:46 Small boat with dignatories on the Canal
40:33 Views of the Canal and Gatun Lake
41:05 Dredgers at work to deepen the Canal
41:36 More lock views
43:03 Busy scenes at the locks
43:52 Spectators on the opening lock doors
46:01 A pilot rowing boat on its way to receive the ropes of a ship
46:42 Inner lock chamber scenes
47:45 Lock doors opening
48:49 Ship leaving the locks
49:13 More steam dredgers at work
50:02 Close up view of an active steam dredger
50:36 Rubble is released through the bottom of a barge into the lake
51:18 Flushing rubble away with a watercanon
52:40 Dredgers seen from a high viewpoint
53:52 Final views of the Canal

In view of the amount of available enhanced footage, Part-2 will follow shortly!

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Video Ship sailing from Liverpool Docks

Bulk Carrier sailing from Seaforth Dock through Gladstone Lock into The River Mersey

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Video Port of Stockton: River Pilots

The San Francisco Bar Pilots are one of the important cogs in our supply chain wheel. They are tasked with boarding the vessels eleven miles west of the Golden Gate Bridge via a rope ladder often in rough seas and taking control of the vessels en route to the Port of Stockton. Once on the bridge of the ship, the Pilot oversees navigation and ensures the safe passage of ships into the Bay and through the Delta until it is secured alongside its berth at the Port. Without these Pilots the Port could not perform its mission to provide jobs and economic stability for the region. Within the larger San Francisco Bar Pilots Association there is a smaller subdivision that is approved to take vessels all the way to the Port of Stockton. They are called the River Pilots and this is their story…

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Video IHMA Congress 2020 - Going Virtual!

With the theme, "The Next Wave – Navigating Towards the Digital Future, the 12th biennial Congress will be delivered virtually from 5 - 10 October, 2020.

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