Video

ESAIL maritime microsatellite


published on 16 September 2020 11

Found on YouTube. Created by "European Space Agency, ESA".
Soon a Vega will launch from Kourou carrying a payload of several satellites. These will be delivered into orbit by a new multi-payload system developed by ESA. Among these small satellites, E-SAIL. This microsatellite is dedicated to supporting maritime traffic and making seafaring safer. It is part of ESA’s SAT-AIS programme, which aims is to increase the coverage of the Automatic Identification System for ships. This system is a short-range coastal tracking system currently used on ships that makes traffic safer but which has a limited range. With microsatellites from the SAT-AIS programme such as E-SAIL maritime shipping can be made safer across the oceans.

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