Article

Danish Butter Cookies...


by Marine Pilot Luis Vale, Portugal - published on 17 July 2019 1581 -

photo and article by Luis Vale, Portugal

It is a known fact that next to the most important equipment on a ship’s bridge (the coffee machine) there will always be a tin of cookies to help the watchkeepers go through the 4 hours watch with their stomachs comforted. Not always known is that these tins of delicious “Danish Butter Cookies” can also give a help navigating the ship…

Back in 1996 we were approaching Hormuz Strait, outbound from the Arabian Gulf, having loaded a full cargo of crude oil at the Iranian Kharg Island terminal. The traffic separation scheme north of Musandam Peninsula demands a large alteration of course, which can be tricky for a 22 meter draft, 342 meters long vessel with heavy traffic nearby. For this reason, the Captain was also on the bridge with the 2nd Officer (at that time, me).

At some distance on our starboard bow, there was a salvage tug approximately with the same heading and speed. She was delaying the course change and soon we would need to start going to starboard and had no acceptable room. Before deciding to slow our speed to increase the distance we tried to call her on the VHF asking if she would alter course before us or proceed with that course. After calling the tugboat a couple of times by her name, with no answer whatsoever and approaching the defined position to alter course, I headed for the phone to call the engineers in order to let them know that I would soon be decreasing the engine revolutions so as to alter course.

Before I could pick up the handset, the Captain impassively told me to wait a moment. He approached the “Danish Butter Cookies” tin, removed the lid and went outside on the bridge wing. Using the sun and the polished interior of the lid as a mirror, he began to flash the bridge of the tug. Almost immediately a voice sounded on the VHF, with the tugboat watchkeeper apologizing after realizing that there was this huge, huge vessel approaching on her port quarter. She instantly altered course to starboard and allowed us also to alter without decreasing the speed...

So, next time you join a ship, check if the “Danish Butter Cookies” are a part of the standard navigational equipment…

Join the conversation...

Login or register to write comments and join the discussion!
DT
Daniel Trinca USA
on 25 April 2021, 12:37 UTC

It should be as part of inventory among toothpicks and toiled papers.
I would say without this a vessel cannot sail.
0

Read more...

Article The use of helmets... or “Why Do Pilots Not Wear Helmets?”

by Marine Pilot Luis Vale, Portugal - published on 20 August 2019

photo and article by Luis Vale, Portugal

1

Article Pilots and ship´s Captains

by Marine Pilot Luis Vale, Portugal - published on 23 August 2019

Lately there has been a considerable increase in opinions of seagoing ship´s masters complaining about pilotage services, expressed whether as LinkedIn articles and comments or in some reputable industry magazines.

1

Article Shiphandling at shipyards, never a dull moment...

by Marine Pilot Luis Vale, Portugal - published on 20 September 2019

Drydocking or undocking is always a difficult task, particularly with a “dead” vessel (no power/propulsion) and the wind blowing on the ship's side.

0

Video A day in the life of a TasPorts' Marine Pilot

published on 5 November 2019

Video by Tasmanian Ports Corporation
TasPorts' Marine Pilot Nick Hess recently produced a video from footage our crews have captured around Tasmania.
The video provides an amazing insight into the work TasPorts’ Marine Pilots undertake every day around the state - an essential part of the business that not many people get the opportunity to see.

0

Video Amazing drone video: Berthing a 230m Bulker in Puerto Brisas (Colombia)

published on 5 April 2020

Using two, 66TBP tugs to assist in berthing the 90,000 GT bulker “Jin Weng Feng”. The port is “Puerto Brisas” at La Guajira, Colombia. The vessel is turned to port just outside the berth limits due to limited room in the basin with enough depth. Then she’s backed in.

0

Video Elizabeth Marami is the first female marine pilot in East Africa

published on 16 September 2020

Kenyans will on Tuesday celebrate the 6th Mashujaa Day to honour the sacrifices and achievements of various individuals in contributing to the welfare of society and the nation at large. In our continuing series of K24 Mashujaa we spotlight a middle aged woman in Mombasa who has beaten all odds to become East Africa's only female marine pilot. Mercy Milanoi spent the day with Elizabeth Marami in the high seas and tells us how she is scaling the heights in a male dominated field.

0

Article An overview of the different spellings for a Marine Pilot

by Marine-Pilots.com - published on 1 December 2019

Please use the menu item "Feedback" if you have another spelling or country-specific name for us.

0

Video iTalk by Ms Reshma Nilofer, Sector Pilotage Services

published on 25 August 2020

iTalk conducted by IME(I) Mumbai Branch. The speaker was Ms Reshma Nilofer, Sector Pilotage Services

0

Article A ship like no other: CMA CGM Jacques Saade, 23,000 TEU, LNG powered

by Marine-Pilots.com - published on 23 September 2020

The CMA CGM JACQUES SAADE joins the fleet: the first 23,000 TEU container vessel in the world to be powered by liquefied natural gas.

1