Article

Online survey: Securing methods of pilot ladders at intermediate length


by Herman Broers - published on 7 December 2020 240

Colleagues,

As you are probably aware, there is no legislation about the way a pilot ladder should be secured on deck at intermediate length. As a result, we as pilots see many different ways of securing in use every day. Some ways are considered safe, some unsafe.

Recently Capt. Troy Evans did a research into the breaking strength of various securing methods. To quantify the problem of unsafe practices, now is time to have a survey into the number of the various securing methods used worldwide.

I call on you to participate and report every pilot ladder that is secured on deck in your next working week, using the online survey form here:
It is an anonymous survey that runs from December 5th, 2020 until January 3rd, 2021. The results will be published online in the beginning of 2021.

We need as many responses as possible. Spread the word amongst fellow pilots, let’s make it safer together.

Stay safe and healthy, very best regards,

Herman Broers
Maritime Pilot, Port of Rotterdam
Editor's note:
Opinion pieces reflect the personal opinion of individual authors. They do not allow any conclusions to be drawn about a prevailing opinion in the respective editorial department. Opinion pieces might be deliberately formulated in a pronounced or even explicit tone and may contain biased arguments. They might be intended to polarise and stimulate discussion. In this, they deliberately differ from the factual articles you typically find on this platform, written to present facts and opinions in as balanced a manner as possible.
Unlimited License Maritime Pilot, Port of Rotterdam. Pilot ladder safety, active marine pilot - Loodswezen Rotterdam - Rijnmond
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