Article

IMPA Safety Campaign Analysis 2016-2020


by Herman Broers - published on 6 January 2021 162

Analysis created by Herman Broers

This is an abridged version of the full analysis. At the end of the article is a link to the full analysis by Herman Broers.

The IMPA safety campaign on pilot ladders has run for a long time now. In this document the results of the IMPA safety campaign have been analyzed from 2016 to 2020.

This analysis shows a growing involvement of maritime pilots in the area of safety of pilot ladders, with the number of reports more than doubling since 2016. Fishing vessels show an improving record of non compliances.

IMPA saftey Campaign Comparison 2016-2020

The following analysis has been made using data from the IMPA Safety Campaign on pilot ladders from 2016 until 2020. The data has been retrieved from the IMPA site and is published with permission from IMPA.

1. Number of returned observations
  • The 2020 campaign had a record number of observations (6394) which is 236% compared to the number of observations of 2016.
  • The increase of observations in 2020 compared to 2019 has mainly been caused by the number of observations from the South American pilots who are now the “leading” contributors to the IMPA safety campaign.
3. Percentage of non-compliant ladders by ship type
  • From the above data, it is clear that the percentage of non-compliant ladders has decreased the most amongst fishing vessels, a decrease from 33% to 15%.
  • The overall spread between categories of ships with non-compliant ladders has narrowed from 25% in 2016 to 14% in 2020.
  • The category with the highest percentage of non-compliant ladders in 2020 is “passenger ships”. (21%)
For more details, download a copy of the analysis here. These data have been published with kind permission of IMPA.
Unlimited License Maritime Pilot, Port of Rotterdam. Pilot ladder safety, active marine pilot - Loodswezen Rotterdam - Rijnmond
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