Article

2022: A large vessel is to cross an ocean autonomously


published on 10 January 2022 709 -

Symbol picture by Hyundai LNG shipping - Hyundai PIACEPIA

For the first time, a large vessel is to cross an ocean autonomously. The giant, developed by Hyundai, could usher in a new era of seafaring.

The vessel with which Do-hyeong Lim wants to make history is a giant: 300 metres long, 50 metres wide, with space for 180,000 cubic metres of liquid gas.

It is to be launched in the summer and cross one of the great oceans, either the Atlantic or the Pacific. The freighter is currently being built in a shipyard in South Korea. If it masters the task ahead of it, it may usher in a new era of seafaring.

Do-hyeong Lim is the head of Avikus, a subsidiary of the South Korean company Hyundai Heavy Industries. Avikus is hardly known in Europe and America, but Lim and his engineers could change the way freight is transported across our oceans. "What's true on the road is also true on the water," Lim tells WORLD on the sidelines of the tech trade show CES in the American city of Las Vegas: "The future is autonomous."

Lim's liquefied natural gas freighter is set to become the world's first large ship to sail self-propelled on the high seas. Not steered by a captain and his crew, but by algorithms, satellites and sensors. The market for such ships is apparently large: according to analysts, it could exceed $230 billion by 2028, with the strongest growth in Europe.
Symbol picture by Hyundai LNG shipping
Symbol picture by Hyundai LNG shipping
Symbol picture by Hyundai LNG shipping
Symbol picture by Hyundai LNG shipping
But the road ahead is tough. Robotic ships pose an enormous technological challenge. "You might think," says Lim, "that it would be easier to build an autonomous freighter than an autonomous car." After all, he says, there is plenty of space on the water and no pedestrians running red lights. "But in reality," Lim says, "it's much harder."

That's because the seas have no lane markings for the ship's computer to orient itself by. Moreover, the surface is not smooth like a motorway. There are waves and currents. The wind must also be taken into account. And near the coast, fishing boats or leisure sailors can suddenly get in the way of the freighters - the equivalent of a careless pedestrian.

For watercraft - as with cars - there are several levels of autonomous driving. Lim's liquefied gas giant operates at level two as defined by the World Maritime Organisation (IMO): the algorithms set the course, avoid obstacles and bypass bad weather, but there are seafarers on board who can take control at any time. Level two is the highest currently permitted in international waters under IMO rules.

Kisun Chung, CEO of Hyundai Heavy Industries Holdings
Kisun Chung, CEO of Hyundai Heavy Industries Holdings
Kisun Chung, CEO of Hyundai Heavy Industries Holdings
Kisun Chung, CEO of Hyundai Heavy Industries Holdings
“Hyundai Heavy Industries Group has grown into the world’s biggest shipbuilder for the past 50 years. Now, it will become a “Future Builder,” creating new values for humankind.”

HHI Group hosted a press conference for international press as well as Korean journalists at its exhibition booth located at LVCC’s West Hall on January 5.

At the press conference, CEO Chung said, “I am proud of the past 50 years of HHI Group, which has laid the groundwork for the growth of the world. In the next 50 years, we will become the world’s best “Future Builder” and create new growth that is more sustainable, smarter, and more inclusive, something we have never seen before.”

CEO Chung’s presentation was followed by the presentations about the visions and goals related to “Future Builder” by Hyogyeong Joo, Engineer of Avikus; Sungjoon Kim, Head of Korea Shipbuilding & Offshore Engineering (KSOE) ‘s Advanced Research Center; and Michael Ryu, Chief Strategy Officer of Clue Insights, Hyundai Doosan Infracore’s AI solutions provider.

Join the conversation...

Login or register to write comments and join the discussion!
RC
Ricardo Caballero Vega Panama Canal Pilots Association, Panama
on 14 January 2022, 01:31 UTC

I will be happy to be retired by then
0

Read more...

Video Autonomous Ships | 10 Reasons why you WONT LOSE YOUR JOB | Life at Sea Series

published on 30 June 2021

Autonomous ships news are often mislead and misinformed, causing worries within the seafaring community while corporations continue to get what they want - publicity, headlines and $$ investments . Life at sea is already hard enough, don't let their exaggeration affect you! WIth a bit of research, all source point to the same conclusion. As Maersk Line's CEO points out - Unmanned Containerships? Not in My Lifetime. In this video I will break them down for you. Here is 10 reasons why...

1

Video The Port Authority of Jamaica | Critical Services - Pilotage

published on 15 April 2021

Pilotage is compulsory in all Jamaican ports and is a necessity for the safe passage and docking of ships entering and leaving the harbours. No ship or vessel can enter our Ports without the #PortAuthorityJa’s pilotage services. #MarinePilots, being the experts in local conditions, are required to assist in the navigation and manoeuvring of vessels in our channels and port areas and are dispatched to all ports in Jamaica on a 24 hour basis. Our #PilotBoatCrew ensures that Marine Pilots are...

1

Video Transit of the Panama Canal with an XDF LNG Carrier on the Newly expanded locks under pilotage

published on 19 December 2020

Join me as we transit through the Panama Canal from the North-East side to the South-West. An interesting vlog on how an XDF LNG carrier transits through the newly expanded Panama Canal.Find out its history and which vessel and Captain transited the Canal on its opening day on the 15th of August 1914.The interaction with the Pilot Captain Arnulfo Cepetno who assist me on transit the Cocoli locks.

2

Article "The 20,000 TEU Club" - The fleet of the largest container vessels.

by Frank Diegel - published on 24 June 2020

The fleets of container vessels storing more than 20,000 TEU is growing. Today the 20,000 TEU Club includes 69 vessels with a total capacity of 1,495,798 TEU.

0

Article The continuum of simulator-based maritime training and education

published on 23 November 2021

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought unprecedented challenges to the maritime supply chain and called for accelerated adoption of digital technologies in various aspects of maritime operations, including the area of maritime education and training (MET).

0

Article 3 new vacancies for Marine Pilots added today

by Frank Diegel - published on 4 October 2021

We have currently researched 20 vacancies for Marine Pilots around the world. Take a look at our job section, where 3 new offers have been added today.

3

Video HMM - Maiden voyage of HMM Algeciras #7-Rotterdam-arrival

published on 23 June 2020

The maiden voyage of HMM Algeciras #7-Rotterdam-arrival: “Steady as she goes” As Rotterdam tugboats skillfully maneuver mega vessel 'HMM Algeciras' safely towards the RWG Terminal mooring – welcoming the 1st of 12 Megamax-24 class HMM vessels to the Netherlands!

0

Video ABB and Keppel O&M collaborate on autonomous tug with remote operation

published on 22 June 2021

ABB, together with Singaporean shipyard Keppel Offshore & Marine (Keppel O&M), has successfully carried out South Asia’s first remote joystick control of a tugboat in the busy Port of Singapore.
The Port of Singapore, with more than 130,000 vessels calling annually, presents one of the most complex settings for autonomous harbor operations in the world. The trial marks a major milestone in validating the increased safety and efficiency of tug operations utilizing digital solutions already...

1

Video Self-Righting Test Fast Pilot Launch for Dutch Pilots (2012)

published on 23 April 2020

Self-Righting Test Fast Pilot Launch for Dutch Pilots. Test executed by Holland Diesel Maassluis and Scheepswerf Made for Nederlands Loodswezen. Location: Port of Maassluis

0

Video Golden Ray Salvage: Last Section Removed on 10/25/2021

published on 28 October 2021

Finally!!! The last section of the ship was removed from the site and taken to port for final salvage. While there is still a lot of clean up remaining this is a big mile stone in the salvage operation of the Golden Ray which capsized over 2 years ago on 9/8/2019 in the sound of St Simons Island, Georgia. Included is the movement of the section along with footage taken from a boat trip at the site and at the port. Some of my best video in the 2 years I've been filming. So I hope you enjoy...

0