How a pilot gets off a fairly large ship

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Pilot boarding

Departing a 159,000 tonne 274 metre long tanker at the Humber Pilot station

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Video Pilot Boat - Carnival Cruise at Port Canaveral

This is a video of the cruise ship pilot boat that picks up the pilot once he has navigated the ship out of the port. This is a requirement of all cruise ships coming into and leaving out of ports. We also noticed them at the Bahamas. I was able to capture this one on my last cruise leaving out of Port Canaveral... watch as the pilot jumps from the cruise ship to the pilot boat while both are moving! :)

Video Disembarking of Danpilot at Skagen V73

Enjoy the tour from Bridge to Pilot ladder, disembarking of Danpilot.

Video Harbor Pilot Disembarking at Bar Pilot Station Liverpool UK

After almost four hours of work to safely guide and assist the Ship's Captain in navigating the vessel out from Liverpool's Royal Seaforth Container/Roro Terminal (RSCT) in Liverpool UK, the Harbor Pilot disembarks at Bar Pilot Station, a rendezvous point or certain place where a ship should take the Sea/River/Harbor Pilot on and off. In this video, the Pilot disembarked at the Starboard side (right side), lee side of the vessel which is the normal practice. The term "lee side" means away or that is sheltered from the wind. The vessel should slow down and maneuver safely to place the vessel to the lee side. Pilots usually advised the Captain of the approximate speed and heading required for this critical phase of ship handling and operation. The ship Captain, being the top in command, is on the bridge navigation deck to oversee, handle and assess safe operation. Good communication is a vital key to this operation. He/She should communicate with the Deck Officer in order for the Deck Ratings to prepare all the equipment and of course the "Pilot ladder" for safe disembarkation. The Captain should communicate with the Pilot boat as well. He/she should also confirm with the Deck Officer that the ladder has been properly checked and rigged as per instruction/recommendation from the Pilot. He/She should also communicate with the Engine room that the Pilot is about to disembark, and upon leaving the vessel, the Deck Officer should report to the Captain that the Pilot has safely disembarked, take note of the time as this is usually included in some of the ship reporting which is to be done later on, the Captain notifies the Engine room of the actual time of Pilot disembarkation. After a safe Pilot disembarkation, the Deck Ratings should secure the Pilot ladder for sea passage, other equipment used and also the Pilot door opening, if there is any. All of this operation should be done with the utmost care, as SAFETY is the top priority onboard.

Video Chifting from quai marinelle To berth 12

Video showing marine pilot navigating a cargo ship from Plan du Port

Video Disembarkation of Pilots on Oulo Finland - 2007

Found on YouTube.

How to assist for disembarkation of Pilots on Oulo Finland. Ice Navigation. Super Ice Class Ship. MV Xanthia. Comfort Ship made in Aker yards. Cadet Life.

Video Meet Captain Lyle Donovan, a San Diego Bay pilot with the San Diego Bay Pilots Association

May is Maritime Month at the Port of San Diego and we are proud to highlight some of our hardworking men and women of the Working Waterfront. Meet Captain Lyle Donovan, a San Diego Bay pilot with the San Diego Bay Pilots Association. His work consists of guiding ships in and out of San Diego Bay in a safe and efficient manner. A typical day includes guiding a 650-foot car carrying vessel or a 950-foot cruise ship into San Diego Bay. This entails boarding the vessels by climbing up a ladder, often in very rough seas and usually when it’s still dark out. The Port of San Diego thanks Captain Donovan and his fellow pilots for their hard work. To read more about the importance of the maritime industry, visit portofsandiego.org/maritimemonth

Article Pilot Boarding and Landing – use of Personal Emergency Radio Devices

by Nick Lee, T&TC Chairman, UK Pilots - published

Personal Locator Beacons (PLB) and other individual MOB devices have been available for some years now and have evolved to incorporate a variety of different alerting methods and combinations. However, usage of these additional enhancements within UK Pilotage is still in its infancy.

Opinion Positioning of vessel at berth by using bridge wing gyro repeater

by Capt. Girish Chandra - published

Today I will discuss a very simple and useful practical trick often used by pilots.

When we have to berth a vessel with small clearances forward and aft (say 20 to 25 mtr fwd and aft) it is very essential that you are able to estimate your position. Now most of the time you have a berthing supervisor on jetty who will help you with position.

Video AIS track of MILANO BRIDGE on 6 April 2020 (Busan port)

According to AIS past track data, the vessel was obviously too fast on 9 knots and also going down the wind (4-5 bft., take a look at the exhaust from the stack) when entered the inner harbour considering the size and displacement. That speed was approximate 3 ship lengths to the pier and there was the on pier wind after the turn.

Why the ship entered the port so fast will be the subject of the investigations to be awaited.

Knowing South Korea procedures there will be no just marine accident but also a criminal investigation into the accident.
Luckily no human serious casualties occurred.

Watch also (video of the accident)
Unofficial internal company timeline report

Video "The Port Pilot" by Richard Blanco - Read by Tom Wilson

The Port Pilot, by Richard Blanco. In _Looking for The Gulf Motel_, 2012, University of Pittsburgh Press.