Video

CBNC: Egypt's Suez Canal could take weeks to clear


published on 25 March 2021 956 -

Found on YouTube. Created by "CNBC Television". Originally published on 2021-03-25.
The massive container ship that ran aground in the Suez Canal, halting traffic in one of the world's busiest waterways, is still stuck. The ship, called the Ever Given, became horizontally wedged in the waterway following heavy winds. Nearly 19,000 ships passed through the canal during 2020, for an average of 51.5 per day, according to the Suez Canal Authority. For access to live and exclusive video from CNBC subscribe to CNBC PRO: https://cnb.cx/2NGeIvi

The massive container ship Ever Given has now been stuck in the Suez Canal for three days, halting billions of dollars in trade as vessels pile up on either side of the waterway.

More than 150 ships are currently waiting to pass through the 120 mile man-made canal, according to estimates from research firm StoneX.

Images captured from vessel tracker MarineTraffic show the extent of the buildup.

The canal handles around 12% of seaborne trade, making it an essential point of passage. Each additional day that the ship is delayed disrupts more than $9 billion worth of goods, according to the Associated Press citing estimates from Lloyd’s List.

Research firm StoneX noted that 24 of the vessels are carrying crude, 15 are refined product tankers, and 16 are liquified natural gas/liquified petroleum gas product carriers.

For ships waiting to cross the canal, alternate options are limited.

“As delays continue, shippers will have to broach the unpalatable decision of whether to make a U-turn and head for the Cape of Good Hope or wait it out in the Red Sea and Mediterranean,” commodity data company Kpler wrote in a note to clients.

Re-routing significantly increases a trip’s length, which translates to higher costs. Sailing from the Suez Canal to Amsterdam takes just over 13 days when traveling at 12 knots, compared to 41 days if traveling around the Cape of Good Hope.

“The event highlights the relative fragility of the on-water trading system, particularly for those flows for which Suez Canal transits make up a higher percentage of total volumes moved,” the firm added.

The ship became horizontally wedged in the waterway following heavy winds. Multiple tugboats were sent to the scene, and a team from Smit Salvage has been called in to assist with the operation.

“Dredging operations to assist refloating the vessel continue. In addition to the dredgers already on site a specialised suction dredger has arrived at the location,” Bernhard Schulte Shipmanagement, which is the technical manager of the vessel, said in a statement. The firm said an early attempt to re-float the vessel on Thursday was unsuccessful, and that another attempt would be made later in the day.

The enormous cargo carrier is more than 1,300 feet long and about 193 feet wide. It weighs more than 200,000 tons. One end of the ship was wedged into one side of the canal, with the other stretching nearly to the other bank.

Nearly 19,000 ships passed through the canal during 2020, for an average of 51.5 per day, according to the Suez Canal Authority. The ship was sailing from China to Rotterdam when it ran aground.

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