Webinar on 24th October: Re-conceptualizing Indian Maritime Pilotage

by AIMPA - All India Marine Pilots' Association - published -
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Webinar on 24th October: Re-conceptualizing Indian Maritime Pilotage

Invitation by AIMPA:

"AIMPA has organised a unique WEBINAR first time ever in India about Indian Pilotage. We understand that this has been long overdue and much needed to revamp the pilotage operations. Benchmarking with the Pilotage done in the era of AI and BIG data our Pilotage is still being operated in past tense. The pilot ladders practices alone are costing industry heavily and yearly 2-3 lives are lost and many injured.

We are looking at deliberating pilot ladder issues along with Pilot transfer procedures in ports and Pilot training needs which finally culminate to safety of Navigation in ports. The safety of navigation alone being the major driver for cargo safety and movement, and anything commercial happening in ports worldwide. The safer the ports are , the more efficient and effective they are.

AIMPA has embarked into a new sensitisation of learning from those in the world who have been there and done that. Hearing these eminent speakers would really be a treat for those who want to be part of the change in India, that the Indian government is willing to see.

While we learn , AIMPA would certainly ensure that the learnings are taken to the policy makers and lawmakers in the country for betterment. AIMPA's vision for safety and security of Maritime Pilot would now be transformed to safety of Navigation as well. while engineer the safer world let's do our part in making India and its ports safe.

We urge that all those related to Maritime Pilot operations, port officials, port authorities, pilot selections and placement, pilot training, port traffic , MTIs faculty, students of presea and post-sea courses, seafarers, ship managers and superintendents attend this webinar.

Please register and join the webinar by clicking the below link:"
Invitation by

Capt. Gajanan Karanjikar,
Master Mariner
President-All India Marine Pilots Association
Editor's note:
Opinion pieces reflect the personal opinion of individual authors. They do not allow any conclusions to be drawn about a prevailing opinion in the respective editorial department. Opinions are usually deliberately formulated in a pronounced or even explicit tone and may contain biased arguments. They are intended to polarise and stimulate discussion. In this, they deliberately differ from factual articles you typically find on this platform, written to present facts and opinions in as balanced a manner as possible.
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