Wärtsilä simulation technology creating an essential testing environment for smart marine solutions

by Wärtsilä Corporation - published -
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Wärtsilä simulation technology creating an essential testing environment for smart marine solutions
Photo and text by Wärtsilä Corporation

The technology group Wärtsilä has delivered a navigation simulator and specific mathematical models to the Satakunta University of Applied Sciences (SAMK) in the city of Rauma, Finland. These will be used as an essential enabler in the Intelligent Shipping Technology Test Laboratory (ISTLAB) project, which aims at creating a technically precise testing environment for remotely controlled, autonomous vessels. The contract with Wärtsilä was signed in the 4th quarter of 2019.

The test laboratory project is the first of its kind in the world, and its unique approach makes it of great interest, and of great value, to the global maritime community. The programme will, in turn, identify and open the prospects and possibilities for remote pilotage.

“This project is yet another example of how Wärtsilä’s simulation technology can enable an essential testing environment for future, ready-to-go, smart marine solutions. The results of this project, and the technology involved, can be utilised worldwide to deliver enhanced safety and efficiency in marine operations,” says Alexander Ozersky, Deputy General Manager, Voyage Solutions, Wärtsilä.

“The intention is to eventually develop an actual case study. However, first we need to carry out simulated testing, and for this the Wärtsilä technology is essential. The overall support from Wärtsilä in this tremendously important project has been critical,” says Meri-Maija Marva, Training Manager, Satakunta University of Applied Sciences.

Wärtsilä and SAMK have worked in close cooperation for more than 20 years. The university already has a full mission simulator with six bridges at its facility, which was installed in 2016.
Wärtsilä Corporation
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