"The 20,000 TEU Club" - The fleet of the largest container vessels.

by Frank Diegel, CEO Marine-Pilots.com - published -
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"The 20,000 TEU Club" - The fleet of the largest container vessels.
"HMM Algericas" at port of Hamburg, photo taken by a video of Jan Tiedemann

The fleets of container vessels storing more than 20,000 TEU

The 20,000 TEU Club today
In June the 20,000 TEU Club includes 69 vessels with a total capacity of 1,495,798 TEU (15th June 2020). More vessels (38) have been ordered with a capacity of 891,168 TEU and should be delivered by the end of the next four years. We don't know what an impact the worldwide corona crisis will have on these counts, but it is the status today.

Source: www.New-Ships.com


The largest vessels today
Today's largest container vessel is the "HMM Algeciras" (23,964 TEU). The vessel was delivered in April 2020 and has already since May two new sisters of the same size: "HMM Copenhagen" and "HMM Dublin". The next sister's "HMM Gdanks" and "HMM Hamburg" follow this month. In September another two follow sister vessels complete the fleet to 7 container vessels of this size in September this year for the Hyundai Merchant Marine (HMM).

HMM's fleet of type "DSME 23,000 TEU", 7 vessels:

Source: www.New-Ships.com
all vessels built by Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering Co. (DSME)



Who are the other members of this exclusive club?

Source: www.New-Ships.com


Is the size of 24,000 TEU the end?
Jan Tiedemann from Alphaliner has figured out that it could be possible to build vessels of 26,000 TEU.
For further information: "Is the 26,000 TEU container vessel coming now?" - article by Marine-Pilots.com
The article also explains the impact of ever larger ships on pilots, tugs, port operators and terminals.

Graphic: Jan Tiedemann, Alphaliner
New Ships Orderbook c/o TRENZ GmbH
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Found on YouTube. Created by "marineinsight".

#Anchor #shipanchor #windlass
Anchoring is one of the very frequent operations onboard ships. A number of variables and external factors influence the duration and location of an anchoring operation. While the type of seabed is of utmost importance during anchoring, soft muddy grounds or clay bottoms are best preferred. It should be taken care that the anchoring bottom is free of power lines, submarine cables, pipelines or rocks.

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Read: 9 Points to Remember When Dropping Ship Anchor in Emergency - https://www.marineinsight.com/guidelines/9-points-remember-dropping-ship-anchor-emergency/

Video Credit: https://www.youtube.com/user/neo5362/
Movie Clip Credit: Caddyshack
Image Credit: http://bit.ly/2VmUB6R

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