Opinion

Conversation with Brett Monthie, a Tampa Bay harbor pilot


by Tampy Bay Times - published on 13 January 2021 381 -

This article was written by Philip Morgan and was already published by "Tampa Bay Times" on 26. December 2020.
Photo by Brett Monthie.


Link to the original and full article below.

When your mission is guiding ships through congested waters

Conversation with Brett Monthie a Tampa Bay harbor pilot graduate of the United States Merchant Marine Academy.

After spending years at sea, Brett Monthie had to chart the channels in Tampa Bay from memory in order to become a Tampa Bay harbor pilot. And then he spent 30 months in training. He’s one of 13 full pilots and six deputy pilots in the Tampa Bay Pilots Association. They guide the ships safely through the bay.

It’s an exacting job, and a dangerous one, considering Monthie has to hop from the pilot boat to the rope ladder hanging down the side of a ship – or from the ladder to the pilot boat – all while both vessels are traveling at about 10 knots. Monthie loves the work.

“It’s a blast. I mean, I have to pinch myself every day,’' he said.

The 36-year-old harbor pilot, a graduate of the United States Merchant Marine Academy, talked with the Tampa Bay Times about his job.

Climbing a rope ladder 30 or more feet up to and down from the main deck of a ship has to be a harrowing experience.
Harrowing I guess is a good word to describe it, because we’ve lost – not Tampa personally – but we’ve lost, out of the 1,200 pilots in the U.S., we’ve had two in the last eight months and three in the last year that have had incidents on ladders (and) passed away.

Does it mostly happen when a pilot falls from the ladder and is caught between the ship and pilot boat?
Yes, typically that’s the case.… Most of the time our boats, once we get on the ladder, they peel away from the ship to avoid that.

Climbing a rope ladder isn’t easy, is it?
No, it’s not easy. Usually going up, to me, is easier. You just look straight up and you go. Coming down is actually a little trickier. You really want to have three points of contact on that (ladder) at all times if you can. And the farther down you go, it almost becomes like a pendulum.… You’re coming off the side of the ship and almost swinging with every step.
Editor's note:
Opinion pieces reflect the personal opinion of individual authors. They do not allow any conclusions to be drawn about a prevailing opinion in the respective editorial department. Opinion pieces might be deliberately formulated in a pronounced or even explicit tone and may contain biased arguments. They might be intended to polarise and stimulate discussion. In this, they deliberately differ from the factual articles you typically find on this platform, written to present facts and opinions in as balanced a manner as possible.
What's your opinion on this?
Login or register to write comments and join the discussion!
Read more...

Article Improve comfort, safety and maneuvering with Humphree.

published on 24 September 2020

By using Humphree's trim and stabilization system, you will reduce resistance, fuel consumption and environmental impact. It also means that the best possible performance and stability is achieved.

Humphree USA reports that it has won numerous orders this year for its automatic stabilization technology in the North American pilot boat segment, with nine new boats either delivered or under construction for eight different pilot associations.

0

Video Tanger Med Pilots in bad weather doing a great job

published on 15 December 2021

The pilots make docking mega-ships look easy despite the meteorological disturbance.
Great pictures from Morocco

0

Video Captain Matt Glass - Houston Pilot (2012)

published on 22 December 2021

Captain Matt Glass, a deputy pilot with the Houston Pilots, boards and guides the UAL Capetown on the Houston Ship Channel from the landing area outside Galveston Bay to the Manchester docks in Houston, a voyage of about 7 hours.

0

Video Look at Life - Pilot Aboard 1963

published on 17 December 2019

Look at Life Vol 01 Transport Pilot Aboard 1963
The story of Britain's pilotage services.

0

Article Challenges in the world’s largest pilot station - pilot services in Brazil

by Marine-Pilots.com - published on 10 June 2020

The 160 pilots allotted to the PZ are distributed in eight pilot companies responsible for attending ships that seek the ports or terminals of Santana (AP), Munguba (PA), Santarém (PA), Trombetas (PA), Juruti (PA) and Itacoatiara (AM), as they sail upriver (against the current).

0

Video La station de pilotage des ports de Casablanca et Jorf-Lasf

published on 16 July 2020

The pilot station of the ports of Casablanca and Jorf-Lasfar operates in accordance with the 1937 Dahir on the reorganization of the pilot station of the port of Casablanca, which regulates all aspects of the organization and operation of the station, including the recruitment of pilots, as well as the pension and relief fund.
With the advent of Law 15/02 in 2005 on port reform, the station spontaneously adhered to it by creating a commercial company in application of article 13 of the said...

0

Video Scheepskijker Havenfotografie Pilotboat Lesath on her wa

published on 9 November 2020

Filmed pilotboat Lesath outbound for her new pickup/drop off ..
These brave man now to bring the ships safe in Port of Rotterdam.
#scheepskijker_havefotografie #maritimepilots #portofrotterdam

1

Article Deckhand injured after falling on pilot boat (New Zealand)

published on 20 January 2022

A Port Otago deckhand was seriously injured in a workplace fall yesterday afternoon.

Port Otago chief executive Kevin Winders said the deckhand on a pilot boat was preparing a ladder to allow a maritime pilot to climb aboard an oil tanker.

0