Opinion

Book review: Practical Ship Handling, Fourth Edition, by Malcolm C. Armstrong


by Kevin Vallance deep sea pilot and author - published on 5 June 2020 638 -

Some ship handlers today use electronic instruments from start to finish and these ships usually have powerful engines and thrusters and an almost unlimited number of personnel on the bridge.

So what is done on such ships if the engines or thrusters fail or if the electronic navigation instruments die? How many tugs do we need? How shall we use them? What type and power are the tugs in this port? How do we communicate with the tugs? Pilots know the answers to these questions as they are applicable to the pilot’s particular district. It takes time to become an experienced pilot and this book will help. Most ships do not have unlimited personnel, in which case the pilot is like a one man band.

Bridge Resource Management (BRM) is the catch phrase of today’s ship handling, but the Resource is often very limited. From this book, ship’s masters and officers can learn a lot about practical ship handling and how they can help the person who has the con and this will be useful knowledge for them whether or not they ever handle a ship themselves; it will certainly help with BRM.

Many of today’s ships, especially very large underpowered ships require assistance from tugs and there are some manoeuvres that are rarely or never executed or observed by some mariners, for example running moor and other anchor work or securing a ship to a single buoy and these are described in this book. There is also good advice about specific helm orders and the need for brevity especially where language is a problem.

Author of the book: Malcolm C. Armstrong, FNI, Hon. Member of IMPA
Editor's note:
Opinion pieces reflect the personal opinion of individual authors. They do not allow any conclusions to be drawn about a prevailing opinion in the respective editorial department. Opinion pieces might be deliberately formulated in a pronounced or even explicit tone and may contain biased arguments. They might be intended to polarise and stimulate discussion. In this, they deliberately differ from the factual articles you typically find on this platform, written to present facts and opinions in as balanced a manner as possible.

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SN
Santosha K Nayak Adani Ports and Special Economic Zone Ltd., India
on 11 June 2020, 17:40 UTC

A new and complete book on marine pilotage has been published in June 2020.
Pls check the link. below.
https://notionpress.com/read/theory-and-practices-of-marine-pilotage
0

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