How does GPS work?

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107

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by Casual Navigation

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Article GPS (Part 1) - Structure, mode of operation, technical and physical fundamentals of GPS

by Capt. Gunter Schütze, Thailand/Germany - published

Of course, as a Nautical Specialist, I also deal with the international discussion on the advantages and disadvantages of satellite-based navigation, e-navigation and conventional terrestrial and astronomical navigation.

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Article GPS (Part 2), physical and technical errors of GNSS - an error analysis

by Capt. Gunter Schütze, Thailand/Germany - published

In my announced sequel, the second part of GPS, it is primarily about the technical and physical operational and functional limitations to which GPS is subject. These limitations, in part, have serious implications for the accuracy of GPS, and even go as far as limiting the functionality of GPS in its functions or even making it impossible. In doing so,

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Article GPS (Part 3) - Accidental interferences and intended Interferences by extern technical sytems

by Capt. Gunter Schütze, Thailand/Germany - published

The vulnerability of GNSS in shore-based use is definitely different and to be regarded as much more risky than on the high seas.

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Video Port Revel Ship Handling Training Centre

Port Revel is a ship handling training center for pilots, captains and officers. Unique in its kind, it allows to acquire new skills, to improve on different manned models at scale 1 / 25th.

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Opinion How OpenBridge seeks to improve maritime workplaces

by Prof. Kjetil Nordby Institute of Design - The Oslo School of Architecture and Design - published

Lack of standard user interfaces across bridge equipment is a major concern for maritime safety. Pilots are in a unique position, as they are constantly exposed to new and differing bridge working environments, equipment, interface designs and combinations of systems. As pilots face this problem throughout every shift they need to put in considerable effort to adjust their work to the many user interfaces they meet.

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Article New app: Pilot´s Tug Assist Tool PTAT - Bollard Pull Calculation for Marine Pilots

by Capt. M. Baykal Yaylai - published

Required tug power and number of tugs needed in variable conditions of wind, current and waves isin most cases an assessment made by pilots based on their professional experience. However, assessments will raise questions by lawyers if something goes wrong. They will use tools to calculate what really is needed with respect to tug power and number of tugs. They have furthermore the advantage of time.

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Video OMC International DUKC® - Port of Melbourne

Footage of deep tanker Felicity navigating through the treacherous waters of the Port Philip Heads channel entrance.

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Video What is the impact of lateral resistance on a ship's turning circle??

Found on YouTube. Created by "Steering Mariners".

This video explains the impact of lateral resistance on the turning circle of a vessel using animations. The video explains the term lateral resistance, shows an example of its impact on the turning circle and its associated aspects (advance, transfer, tactical diameter and drift angle).
Contents of this video will benefit mariners preparing for exams (written and oral examinations).

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Video EMMA Extension – Smart fairway digitalization pilot in Saimaa

Found on YouTube. Created by "project_emma BSRP".

The smart fairway digitalization pilot is a part of the EMMA Extension project that is funded by the Interreg Baltic Sea Region Programme. This summer, 34 smart buoys were installed in the Saimaa deep fairway, which is Finland’s most important inland waterway for merchant shipping.
Safety is enhanced in particular by the fact that the pilots and VTS can adjust the light output of beacons and the rhythm of lights to support the navigation of vessels in poor visibility and weather conditions. The light output can be adjusted in real time centrally by the VTS center and, if necessary, even with a tablet used by the pilot.
Remote-controlled signs send information about, among other things, the functionality of the light, the condition of the power supply, and the actual location of the sign. All this information improves the navigability of the fairway as well as increases maritime safety. Modern technology also reduces the carbon footprint, while location inspections of signs can be done more efficiently.
Read more about the EMMA Extension pilot and the project itself on the EMMA website: http://www.project-emma.eu/

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