Article

Report on P&I claims involving vessels under pilotage 1999-2019


published on 22 December 2020 229

The International Group of P&I Clubs has published a new report on pilotage:

Executive Summary

This report on incidents involving vessels under pilotage, is an update on that issued in 2006. The IG’s first report examined five years of data between 1999 and 2004. This report covers a twenty-year period between 1999 and 2019 in which there were 1,046 incidents and resulting liabilities in excess of US$1.82bn

Whilst there is volatility in the number and severity of incidents in each year, the yearly average of 52 incidents equates to one incident per week, and the average value per incident is approximately US$1.74m. Whilst the overall cost is substantial, the number of incidents is however very small in comparison with the overall number of acts of pilotage undertaken every year.

The report considers incidents in four categories – Allision/Contact with Fixed or Floating Objects (FFO), Collision, Grounding, and Navigation, the latter category encompassing incidents such as those caused by the wash of a vessel.

As may be expected, incidents in the Allision/FFO category constitute the majority – 60% of the total number – and cost in excess of US$1.14bn. Collision incidents represent 31% of the total number and cost in excess of US$479m.

Although the report is focused upon data in the Clubs’ underwriting years up to and including 2018, there is comment upon some limited data for 2019. This is because of the severity of three incidents in that year, all of which involve contacts between container vessels and gantry cranes. There have in addition been two more recent incidents of a similar nature notified to the IG Pool for the 2020 underwriting year. The berthing of large container vessels is identified as an area of focus for further work.
The yearly average of 52 incidents equates to one incident per week, and the average value per incident is approximately US$1.74m.
This graphic depicts the overall cost of Allision and FFO incidents each year. Information for 2019 has been included because of the substantial cost of such claims in that year. The hatched area in the column for 2019 reflects the known claims experience for that year which is not yet included in the data reported to the IG. The volatility in 2007 has already been commented upon. Between 1999 and 2012 there is an upward trend which then declines markedly between 2012 and 2016. Since 2016 the trend has been upwards, and that trend is particularly marked if the more complete total for 2019 is included.

Statement from the Chairman of the International Group’s Pilotage subcommittee – Chris Adams, said:
“This report provides a valuable overview of the nature, frequency, severity and overall cost associated with incidents that occur when a vessel is navigating with the assistance of a pilot. Although the overall cost of such incidents over the twenty-year period covered by this report is very significant, the frequency of incidents in comparison with the overall number of ship movements annually is thankfully very low. Nonetheless, there continue to be concerns, particularly in respect of recent and recurrent incidents involving large container vessels and contact with gantry cranes. In recommending continued and enhanced focus upon training in relation Bridge Resource Management whilst vessels are under pilotage, the report recognises the need to acknowledge the role played by ships’ masters and navigating officers in the vessels’ passage under pilotage. However, in order to better understand the root cause of incidents and to identify measures that will serve to avoid recurrence, the report also proposes a collaborative approach for the future in the investigation of such incidents. The International Group therefore will welcome the co-operation and support of pilotage authorities and the shipowner and pilotage representative bodies, in particular the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) and the International Maritime Pilots Association (IMPA), in working to achieve this aim of reducing the number and severity of such incidents.”
Statement from the Chairman of the International Group’s Pilotage subcommittee – Chris Adams, said:
“This report provides a valuable overview of the nature, frequency, severity and overall cost associated with incidents that occur when a vessel is navigating with the assistance of a pilot. Although the overall cost of such incidents over the twenty-year period covered by this report is very significant, the frequency of incidents in comparison with the overall number of ship movements annually is thankfully very low. Nonetheless, there continue to be concerns, particularly in respect of recent and recurrent incidents involving large container vessels and contact with gantry cranes. In recommending continued and enhanced focus upon training in relation Bridge Resource Management whilst vessels are under pilotage, the report recognises the need to acknowledge the role played by ships’ masters and navigating officers in the vessels’ passage under pilotage. However, in order to better understand the root cause of incidents and to identify measures that will serve to avoid recurrence, the report also proposes a collaborative approach for the future in the investigation of such incidents. The International Group therefore will welcome the co-operation and support of pilotage authorities and the shipowner and pilotage representative bodies, in particular the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) and the International Maritime Pilots Association (IMPA), in working to achieve this aim of reducing the number and severity of such incidents.”

Get the full report here:

Get the full report here
Get the full report here
Get the full report here
Get the full report here

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GK
Gajanan Karanjikar India
on 29 December 2020, 03:04 UTC

This is a good report , should be published in journals for wider curculations.
0

KT
Kuong Chiing Tiong Maritime Pilots Malaysia - MPM, Brunei
on 26 December 2020, 05:04 UTC

very informative..
0

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