Overview of Associated British Ports Marine Pilot Apprenticeships

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Overview of Associated British Ports Marine Pilot Apprenticeships
Example photo by Antonio Alcaraz - www.HarbourPilot.es
Text by Rhys Davies, current Apprentice. Published already in Feb. 2020 by ABP - Link below

Introduction
I made the jump ashore and joined ABP as a Marine Pilot Apprentice in September 2018, coming from a background in the shipping industry (Officer of the watch), now in my 2nd year of a 2 year Level 5 Apprenticeship. Under UK Law, A marine pilot is a person employed by a ship (But not part of the ship’s crew) that is inbound or outbound of a UK port, who has the “Command of the navigation” within pilotage waters.

ABP has created an apprenticeship program
which allows younger officers with seagoing experience (Minimum of OOW + 12 months sea time needed), a chance to get a foot in the door in the world of pilotage. The eventual qualification goal is to achieve a diploma in marine pilotage, as well as to authorise as a “Class 3” pilot within your chosen district (In my case, South Wales).

The first year of this apprenticeship involved moving to the Humber region, where I would begin “tripping” onboard ships inbound and outbound of the Humber ports. “Tripping” is the term used when a pilot in training accompanies another pilot as an observer. As the Humber region is viewed as one of the most difficult areas in the world to navigate, it is viewed that if you can pilot on the Humber, then you can pilot anywhere.

The purpose of the first year
would be to observe and gain as much experience of ship handling and bridge procedures, as well as taking in as much as possible about pilotage generally. I was given the opportunity to get “hands on” with manoeuvring and conduct acts of pilotage independently.

An act of pilotage consists of several parts, and no two days are the same. Whilst training, we are allowed to pick and choose our own jobs. This allows a great deal of flexibility and allows us to choose jobs which will be most beneficial to our training and experience.

During the first year,
I also had the opportunity to overserve other operations associated with pilotage, which would normally not have been possible. Operations such as dredging, hydrographic surveying, buoy moves, V.T.S watch keeping, Tug boat operations, pilot cutter boarding’s & landings etc. Being given a chance to observe these operations allows the pilot to have a much deeper understanding of the “Bigger picture” of what goes on within a port.

I also completed a diploma in marine pilotage, through the maritime training academy. This consisted of 10 module subjects delivered over a series of study weeks, with a 3-hour exam accounting for 75% of the total marks.

After spending 1 year based on the Humber, I then moved down to South Wales, where I would commence a 1 year training program to eventually authorise as a pilot for the South Wales region. This covers the ports of Newport, Cardiff, Barry, Port Talbot & Swansea, as well as the River Usk.

As I am now in my second year of training, I will be looking to complete the “End point assessment” in order to complete the apprenticeship, as well as becoming an authorised pilot. To authorise as a pilot, I will be required to complete a local knowledge written exam, an oral exam with the Pilotage manager & Harbour master, as well as have onboard assessments by a senior pilot for each port (1 inbound & 1 outbound).

The end point assessment will be completed by external assessors and will consist of an interview type exam, as well as an onboard practical exam (Observation of an act of pilotage).
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Video Training of the Elbe pilots - documentary (in german)

Found on YouTube. Created by "NDR Doku".

Die Lotsenbrüderschaft Elbe ist ein geschlossener Kreis, der sich nicht gern in die Karten schauen lässt. Wer dort Mitglied werden und bis zu 400 Meter lange Containerpötte in den Hamburger Hafen steuern möchte, muss hohe Anforderungen erfüllen. Bewerber müssen mehrere Jahre lang zur See gefahren sein, um ausreichend Fahrpraxis zu haben. Aber es gibt immer weniger deutsche Seeleute, weil die Reeder billigere Kräfte aus dem Ausland bevorzugen. Dadurch wird es zunehmend schwierig, qualifizierten Nachwuchs zu finden. Die Folge: Auf der Elbe fehlen die Lotsen.

Lars Kruse und Lukas Treetzen sind nach dem Studium der Nautik schon viele Jahre zur See gefahren als Offizier und als Kapitän. Um künftig auch den Alltag mit ihren Kindern leben zu können, haben sie beschlossen, Lotsen zu werden. So könnten sie ihrer Leidenschaft Seefahrt treu bleiben, müssten den Heimathafen und ihre Familien aber nicht mehr für Monate verlassen.

Kruse und Treetzen haben den Ausbildungsplatz bekommen.

Um Containerriesen sicher durch die Elbe zu bugsieren, müssen sie den Fluss wie ihre Westentasche kennen. Das Revier ist anspruchsvoll, die Verantwortung enorm, ein Schiff kann heute einen Wert von mehreren Milliarden Euro haben. Mehr als die Hälfte des Im- und Exports wird in Deutschland auf dem Seeweg abgewickelt. Ohne Lotsen ginge das nicht. Wie kann also das Nachwuchsproblem gelöst werden? Denn immer weniger junge Menschen erlernen den nautischen Beruf und fahren zur See, Voraussetzung, um später als Lotse arbeiten zu können.

Die Bundeslotsenkammer kämpft seit Jahren um eine Gesetzesänderung: Künftig soll der Nachwuchs nicht mehr nur aus der Seefahrt rekrutiert werden können, sondern direkt von den Universitäten. Die Ausbildung der Lotsen läge dann noch mehr in der Hand der Brüderschaften. 

Der Autorin Gesa Berg ist es gelungen, einen Einblick in die Welt der Elblotsen zu bekommen. Sie begleitete die Lotsenanwärter und ihren Ausbilder, den erfahrenen Lotsen Thorsten Meyer, während ihrer achtmonatigen Ausbildung: Überlebenstraining in der Elbe, Abseilen vom Helikopter und lernen, lernen, lernen. Eine Schule, die es in sich hat, selbst für gestandene Seeleute.

Mehr dazu: https://www.ndr.de/fernsehen/sendungen/die_reportage/Die-neuen-Elblotsen-Gefragt-und-gefordert,sendung1093806.html

#ndr #doku #elblotsen

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Article ABP Southampton puts pressure on non-compliant 'trap door' Arrangements

by Marine-Pilots.com - published

ABP Southampton: NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that some ships have a pilot transfer arrangement consisting of an accommodation ladder / pilot ladder combination with a trapdoor that does not meet IMO standards in effect since at least 2012.

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Article 18 new job vacancies for Pilots' and Harbour Masters in October 2020

by Marine-Pilots.com - published

We frequently search the internet for our members and find job offers for pilots or Harbour Masters.

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Video Safe at sea with satellites (AIS)

Found on YouTube. Created by "European Space Agency, ESA"

At sea, space technology is used to help save lives every day: managing traffic between ships, picking up migrants and refugees in distress or spotting oil spills. The European Space Agency is once again at the forefront developing new technologies and satellites: to keep us safe at sea and to monitor the environment. Space makes a difference here on Earth and certainly at sea where there is no infrastructure.

Recommendation by Marine-Pilots.com
AIS services are offered by, for example:

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by Gard AS - published

The Master and pilot are dependant on each other for a safe and successful beginning or end of a voyage. They are both operating in a foreign environment.

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Video Route Planning With ECDIS

Found on YouTube. Created by "Marine Online".
What is voyage planning, Who is responsible, how do we comply with the rules and how do we utilize the features and functions available in an ECDIS?

Chart Projections and Chart Accuracy
https://youtu.be/kOaWimnAN-U

Principle Used For Creating Electronic Charts
https://youtu.be/xY_MBubhUFs

Display of Electronic Charts
https://youtu.be/qnoFO0T-cLo

Route Planning With ECDIS
https://youtu.be/s5ebZQru7mg

Sailing With ECDIS
https://youtu.be/GZrmzE24K44

Whats is Electronic Chart Display?
https://youtu.be/l6d6TifI2hA

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Video Importance of Wearing Safety Helmets at Work. Examples for Pilots

Found on YouTube. Created by "We Are Navigators".

Importance of Wearing Safety Helmets at Work. ...

Hard hats or Safety helmets act as the first line of defense against head injury, but they only work when they are worn correctly. Thus, it's safe to say safety Helmets save lives and reduce the risk of brain injury.
#wearenavigators
info@wearenavigators.com
www.wearenavigators.com

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Video Pivot Point Demo - HS Wismar

Found on YouTube. Created by "ISSIMS GmbH - Marine Prediction Technology".
SAMMON Lecturing Video describing
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-------------------------------------------------------------
SAMMON - the IDEAL tool to identify manoeuvring capabilities of a ship - SAMMON - learning the EFFECTIVE way

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Video Old Dutch Pilot Boat, NorthSea Trials, Old Marine Engine 750HP@300RPM

Found on YouTube. Created by "MLV CASTOR".

WWW.LOODSBOOT.EU

Newly revised Smit-MAN marine diesel aboard the Dutch Pilot Boat "Castor" taken to sea for trials.

De oude loodsboot Castor van Rotterdam naar Delfzijl om daar het EemsDollard havenfestival 2008 bij te wonen.
De eerste keer dat de onlangs gereviseerde hoofdmotor draaide!

WWW.LOODSBOOT.EU

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Video Serious Injury to Pilot video by Maritime Training Services

Serious Injury to Pilot delves into a real-world incident that resulted from a lack of attention to detail. A pilot falls from a ladder due to negligence.

Visit https://maritimetraining.com/Course/Serious-Injury-to-Pilot to purchase the full-length version.

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