Video

AIS track of MILANO BRIDGE on 6 April 2020 (Busan port)


published on 8 April 2020 10668

According to AIS past track data, the vessel was obviously too fast on 9 knots and also going down the wind (4-5 bft., take a look at the exhaust from the stack) when entered the inner harbour considering the size and displacement. That speed was approximate 3 ship lengths to the pier and there was the on pier wind after the turn.

Why the ship entered the port so fast will be the subject of the investigations to be awaited.

Knowing South Korea procedures there will be no just marine accident but also a criminal investigation into the accident.
Luckily no human serious casualties occurred.

Watch also (video of the accident)
Unofficial internal company timeline report
Busan, South Korea

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RH
René Hartung Lotsenbrüderschaft NOK II Kiel / Lübeck / Flensburg, Germany
on 22 May 2020, 12:12 UTC

I guess a forward tug would not have had much of an effect anyway considering the speed of the vessel was >5kn

That reduces the possibilities of the aft tug on direct towing to a minimum also. I would think that almost all its power would go into keeping up with the vessels speed while on direct towing position.
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